Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent Review (Bought & Tested!)

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Rating and Summary

The Coleman Skydome Tent is a roomier version of the traditional Coleman Sundome Tent. On top of that, the Skydome also has an extra big door, more storage options, and better ventilation.

However, I found that the rain protection at the front of the Skydome Tent could have been better, and I’m also not a big fan of their pre-attached pole system. It definitely isn’t a “quick pitch” that sets up in “5 minutes”. In fact, I found the set-up timing to be the exact same as the Sundome Tent.

Would I still recommend it though? Do read on to find out!

This is a picture of me in my Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent in my yard.
This is a picture of me in my Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent in my yard.
7
Ease of Use
6.5
Spaciousness
7.3
Comfort & Features
9.5
Ventilation
7
Rain Protection
7.1
Quality
9
Portability
Overall Score 7.3 / 10

Pros: HUGE door, good storage options, good ventilation
Cons: Requires seam sealant for heavy rain, not a “quick-pitch” as marketed by Coleman

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Check out the Coleman Skydome Tent:

Product Details

In this section, I’ll be showing you these few things:

  • Unboxing
  • In the Box
  • Specifications

Unboxing

I bought this Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent from Amazon, and here’s what it looked like when it first arrived from Amazon:

A cardboard box from Amazon.
A cardboard box from Amazon.

And here’s what the Skydome Tent looks like straight out of the box:

This is a picture of me unboxing the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me unboxing the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.

In the Box

Out of the box, I got a carry bag, a gear loft, the tent body with the attached poles, a blue rainfly, 13 stakes, the rainfly pole, and also a foot mat.

This is what the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent looked like out of the box. In this picture you can see the tent body with the attached poles (gray and black), the rainfly (blue), and the gear loft at the bottom (black).
This is what the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent looked like out of the box. In this picture you can see the tent body with the attached poles (gray and black), the rainfly (blue), and the gear loft at the bottom (black).

The stakes and the rainfly pole both came in separate carry cases, which is nice:

In this picture, you can see the carry case of the stakes as well as the rainfly pole of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.
In this picture, you can see the carry case of the stakes as well as the rainfly pole of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.

Specifications

Here are all my personal measurements on the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent:

  • Peak height: 59 inches
  • Length: 7 feet 10 inches
  • Width: 6 feet 11 inches
  • Base Area: 54.2 square feet
  • Floor material: Polyethylene
  • Bathtub flooring: Yes, ~6.5 inches
  • Tent body material: Polyester
  • Rainfly material: Polyester
  • Poles material: Fiberglass
  • Number of poles: 3 (2 are pre-attached)
  • Mesh: Regular
  • Packed size: 25 by 9 by 9 inches
  • Weight: 10.4 lbs
  • Number of guylines: 7
  • Number of stakes: 13
  • Number of doors: 1
  • Hinged door: No
  • Number of windows: 1
  • Number of vents: 3
  • Number of pockets: 2 (Note: 1 of them is split into 4)
  • Number of lantern loops: 1
  • Number of gear lofts: 1
  • E-port: No
  • Black-out: No

I also did some testing on my own, and came up with this data:

  • Set up timing (1 person): 9.5 minutes
  • Take down timing (1 person): 10 minutes
  • Number of single sleeping pads: 4
  • Number of queen-sized mattresses: 1

Testing and Performance

I put my Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent through these 7 different tests:

  1. Ease of use: Set up, take down
  2. Spaciousness: Height, base area, mattress sizing
  3. Comfort and features: Door, windows, storage options
  4. Ventilation: Hot day ventilation, rainy day ventilation
  5. Weather protection: Hose test and natural rain test (both heavy rain)
  6. Quality: Material, mesh, seams, stitching, zippers, poles
  7. Portability: Weight and packed size

Set Up

For the ease of set up, I’ll give you both the:

  1. Instructions, as well as the
  2. Timing.

Set Up Instructions

To set up this Coleman Skydome Tent, first lay the tent body on the ground, then go to the back of the tent.

This is a picture of the Coleman Skydome Tent flat on the ground in my yard.
This is a picture of the Coleman Skydome Tent flat on the ground in my yard.

The back of the Skydome Tent is where you’ll find these black fiberglass poles, which look like this:

This is what the pre-attached fiberglass poles of the Coleman Skydome Tent look like.
This is what the pre-attached fiberglass poles of the Coleman Skydome Tent look like.

These poles are attached to the tent body at one end, like this.

A close-up shot of how each pole is pre-attached.
A close-up shot of how each pole is pre-attached.

Next, put both these poles together. At the other end of each pole, you’ll find a small black ball, which looks like this:

This is a close-up shot of what Coleman calls 'fast fitting feet' of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a close-up shot of what Coleman calls ‘fast fitting feet’ of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

This small black ball, or ‘fast fitting feet’, is to be inserted into this small black pocket attached to the bathtub flooring of the tent.

This is a picture of me inserting the fast-fitting foot of each pole into the pole pocket.
This is a picture of me inserting the fast-fitting foot of each pole into the pole pocket.

When you’re done setting up both poles, they’ll look like this. Bear in mind that they won’t be able to stand on their own yet:

Both poles of the Coleman Skydome Tent have been set up in place.
Both poles of the Coleman Skydome Tent have been set up in place.

Now, pick up both poles until they crisscross at the top. Then, while using one hand to hold the poles up, bend down and use your other hand to pick up the center pole clips, like what I’m doing in this picture:

In this picture, I'm bending down to pick up the center pole clips to attach to the poles of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
In this picture, I’m bending down to pick up the center pole clips to attach to the poles of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

The center pole clips are just 2 clips together, which look like this:

A close-up shot of the center pole clips.
A close-up shot of the center pole clips.

After that, clip the 2 center pole clips to the middle of each fiberglass pole. Here’s how I normally clip them; just 1 clip on each pole.

I clipped 1 of the center pole clips to 1 pole, and the other to the other pole.
I clipped 1 of the center pole clips to 1 pole, and the other to the other pole.

Now, clip the rest of the pole clips to the fiberglass poles. Just clip each pole clip intuitively to the nearest pole. There are 8 pole clips at the front of the tent, with 4 pole clips at each side:

This is a picture of me clipping all the pole clips to the fiberglass poles at the front of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of me clipping all the pole clips to the fiberglass poles at the front of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

At the back of the tent, there are another 6 pole clips, with 3 pole clips at each side.

This is a picture of me clipping all the pole clips to the fiberglass poles at the back of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of me clipping all the pole clips to the fiberglass poles at the back of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Then, use the provided steel stakes to stake down the tent body, with 2 stakes at the back, and another 2 stakes at the front. So, 4 stakes in total. I usually use the loop of this red webbing to drive each stake through.

A close-up shot of a stake in the webbing of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A close-up shot of a stake in the webbing of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

After that, drape the rainfly over the tent, with the shortest part of the rainfly at the front, over the door, while the other sides have much longer rainflies. Also, make sure that the Coleman logos on the rainfly are positioned at each width of the tent.

A picture of me pointing to the Coleman logo at one of the widths of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A picture of me pointing to the Coleman logo at one of the widths of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

To secure the rainfly, there are 4 of these S-hooks on the rainfly to be hooked to this black loop on the red webbing at the 4 corners of the tent.

A close-up shot of the S-hook of the rainfly and the loop it's to be secured to.
A close-up shot of the S-hook of the rainfly and the loop it’s to be secured to.

Also, on the underside of the rainfly, there are these Velcro attachments that you can secure to the fiberglass poles, to better align the rainfly. I usually use both attachments at the front, so 4 altogether at the front, and just 1 attachment at each side at the back.

A close-up shot of the Velcro attachment on the underside of the rainfly of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A close-up shot of the Velcro attachment on the underside of the rainfly of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Now, put the rainfly pole together, and insert it into the rainfly pole sleeve at the tip of the rainfly over the door. You can see the rainfly pole sleeve in this picture here:

A close-up shot of the rainfly pole sleeve of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A close-up shot of the rainfly pole sleeve of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

To secure this pole, insert each end of the pole into this ring in one of the pole clips. There are 2 rings for both ends of the pole.

A close-up shot of the ends of the rainfly pole being secured.
A close-up shot of the ends of the rainfly pole being secured.

After that, guy out the entire tent with the 7 pre-attached guylines. There are 3 guylines on each width of the tent, and one more guyline at the back of the tent.

This is a picture of me guying out the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of me guying out the Coleman Skydome Tent.

The last 2 stakes are for the foot mat, which I don’t normally use.

This is a picture of the foot mat that comes with every Coleman tent, plus 2 stakes needed to stake it down.
This is a picture of the foot mat that comes with every Coleman tent, plus 2 stakes needed to stake it down.

Set Up Timing

Altogether, it took me about 9.5 minutes to set up the entire Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent on my own.

Take Down + Pack Up

Take Down Timing

Taking down the Coleman Skydome Tent is just the opposite of the set-up, and it took me about 10 minutes for the entire take down and pack up.

Pack Up Instructions

To pack up the Coleman Skydome Tent, I usually fold the tent body in half, from the front of the tent to the back.

This is a picture of me folding up my Coleman Skydome Tent in my yard.
This is a picture of me folding up my Coleman Skydome Tent in my yard.

Then, I fold it in half again, so that the poles, originally at 2 ends of the tent, meet at one end, and here’s what they look like.

This is the Coleman Skydome Tent folded in half twice.
This is the Coleman Skydome Tent folded in half twice.

Then, I fold it in half one more time, without touching the poles, so that they’re still together, like this.

This is the Coleman Skydome Tent folded in half thrice.
This is the Coleman Skydome Tent folded in half thrice.

Then, I roll the tent body up starting with the poles, so that they’re nicely packed in. I tie the tent up, and put it back into the carry bag.

This is a picture of me packing up the Coleman Skydome Tent by rolling it up.
This is a picture of me packing up the Coleman Skydome Tent by rolling it up.

As for the rainfly, I usually fold it in half about 4 or 5 times, as best as I can, and tuck all the guylines in.

Then, I pack up the rainfly pole, all the stakes, the gear loft, and the foot mat. After that, I grip the bag between my legs to squeeze it together while zipping it up.

This is a picture of me packing up all the other items of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of me packing up all the other items of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

It’s a bit of a tight fit, but I can usually fit everything back in without having to expand the bag by ripping this strip off.

You can remove this white strip at the bottom of each Coleman tent's carry bag to expand it.
You can remove this white strip at the bottom of each Coleman tent’s carry bag to expand it.

More Instructions

For more details on the set up, take down and pack up, you can check out my YouTube video right here:

Height

The peak height in this Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent is just 59 inches, and I’m about 5’3″, so I can’t stand upright even at the peak height, and I had to slouch and bend my knees quite a bit.

This is a picture of me standing under the peak height of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me standing under the peak height of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.

The rest of the tent just slopes downwards too, because this is a dome-shaped tent (i.e. you don’t get to enjoy the peak height throughout the tent).

This is a picture of me at the corner of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of me at the corner of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Base Area

For the base area, I looked not only at the base dimensions, but also the mattress sizing.

Base Dimensions

The length inside this Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent measures about 7 feet and 10 inches, while the width measures about 6 feet and 11 inches, so slightly smaller than the marketed dimensions of 8 by 7 feet.

This is a close-up shot of the Coleman marketed dimensions on the carry bag of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.
This is a close-up shot of the Coleman marketed dimensions on the carry bag of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.

Single Pad Sizing

But despite the slightly smaller actual dimensions, I could still easily fit 4 regular sleeping pads, or 2 double pads, inside the tent, and here’s what having 2 double pads looks like. I’ve also added the dimensions of each double pad for good measure.

This is what the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent looks like with 2 double pads (the Exped MegaMat Duo 10 and the Klymit Uninsulated Double V).
This is what the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent looks like with 2 double pads (the Exped MegaMat Duo 10 and the Klymit Uninsulated Double V).

You do have to sleep shoulder to shoulder, and there’ll be hardly any space leftover for much camping gear.

I think it’s quite a tight fit though, especially at this corner, because the pocket is barely 1 or 2 inches away from my face.

The pocket of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent hangs down low, and gets annoying for the person sleeping in that particular corner.
The pocket of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent hangs down low, and gets annoying for the person sleeping in that particular corner.

Also, my head touches the wall of the tent when I sit up.

Notice that my head and body are pressing up against the wall of the tent.
Notice that my head and body are pressing up against the wall of the tent.

Queen Bed Sizing

I think having 2 people on 1 queen-sized bed would be a much more comfortable fit, and here’s what the Skydome 4-Person Tent looks like with this queen bed. There’s also plenty of room for storing gear, which is always very nice to have.

This is what the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent looks like with 1 queen bed in it.
This is what the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent looks like with 1 queen bed in it.

Window

Number of Windows

This Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent has just 1 window, on the front wall of the tent. Here’s what it looks like:

This is what the window of the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like from the inside of the tent.
This is what the window of the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like from the inside of the tent.
This is what the window of the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like from the outside of the tent. That's me in the window.
This is what the window of the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like from the outside of the tent. That’s me in the window.

The rest of the walls are just made of mesh, covered by the rainfly. I’ll go through about these mesh walls in more detail further down this article.

Window Details

The window measures about 47 inches, so almost 4 feet in length, and about 21 inches in width. It comes with 2 black Coleman zippers, which look like this:

A close-up shot of the window zippers in the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A close-up shot of the window zippers in the Coleman Skydome Tent.

It also comes with a bug net to stop larger bugs like mosquitoes from getting in, and a window latch to hold the fabric when the window’s open.

A close-up shot of the window latch in the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A close-up shot of the window latch in the Coleman Skydome Tent.

You don’t have to use the window latch though, you can just tuck the window fabric against the bug net. This also makes it easier to zip the window open and shut without any fumbling.

Door

Number of Doors

The single window is also part of the single door in this Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.

This is what the door of the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like when it's open.
This is what the door of the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like when it’s open.

Door Details

When opened, the door of the Skydome 4-Person Tent measures a whopping 4 feet in length, and 39 inches in width, so it’s really quite big, and here’s what it looks like in comparison to my size.

This is a picture of me standing in front of the door of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of me standing in front of the door of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

And also, here’s what it looks like when I walk in and out of the tent through the door.

This is a picture of me ducking to get through the door of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of me ducking to get through the door of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Similar to the window, this door also comes with 2 black Coleman zippers to zip it open and shut. And unlike most other Coleman tents, which come with door latches by the side to tie the door fabric up, this Skydome door comes with this triangular pocket at the side, so that you can stuff the fabric in there when the door is opened.

This is what the door pocket of the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like.
This is what the door pocket of the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like.

It’s really user-friendly and easy to stuff the fabric in, and it takes a much shorter time too.

Storage

Pockets

For storage, there are 2 pockets, one is right behind the triangular door pocket, right here.

There's a pocket for storing a few things behind the door pocket of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
There’s a pocket for storing a few things behind the door pocket of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

It measures 17 inches in length and 16 inches in width, and it’s a funny triangular shape too, so you won’t be able to fit that many things in.

There’s also another pretty big pocket on another wall of the Skydome Tent, which measures about 24 inches in length and 7 inches in width. It has been split into 4 with black stitches in between (you can see this in the picture below). So, I guess technically that’s 4 pockets.

This is what the main pocket of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent looks like.
This is what the main pocket of the Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent looks like.

Lantern Loop

There’s also 1 loop at the top of the center of the Skydome tent, where you can hang a lantern for lighting at night.

This is the lantern loop of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is the lantern loop of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Gear Loft

The Skydome Tent also comes with 4 more loops near the lantern loop. This is for the gear loft, which will be included with your purchase.

This is the gear loft of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is the gear loft of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

The gear loft measures about 23 by 19 inches, and comes with these S-hooks to be hooked to the top of the Skydome Tent.

A close-up of one of the S-hooks of the gear loft.
A close-up of one of the S-hooks of the gear loft.

It’ll kind of block your lantern loop though, so you can’t hang a super big lantern if you want the gear loft up.

Other Features

Oh, and there’s no e-port in the tent.

Hose Test

My first rain test was using this water hose, and I tried to spread the rainfall evenly across the entire Skydome tent.

This is a picture of me using a water hose to hose down my Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of me using a water hose to hose down my Coleman Skydome Tent.

After 15 minutes of this heavy rain, I stopped to check in on the tent. I found that the bottom of the door was pretty wet, so do be careful when opening the door.

This is me not letting the door of the Skydome Tent droop into the tent.
This is me not letting the door of the Skydome Tent droop into the tent.

Inside the tent, at the front of the tent, I found that the un-taped bathtub flooring seam had started leaking, like so:

The bathtub flooring seam of the Skydome Tent had started leaking a little.
The bathtub flooring seam of the Skydome Tent had started leaking a little.

What’s the damage after 15 minutes of heavy rain? A few droplets of water inside the tent.

The damage in the Skydome Tent after 15 minutes of heavy rain.
The damage in the Skydome Tent after 15 minutes of heavy rain.

Unfortunately, it gets a little worse. Because the rainfly doesn’t extend out enough over the door, when I shook the tent, the water from the roof of the Skydome tent just dripped right into the tent, like so:

Water dripping straight into the Skydome Tent.
Water dripping straight into the Skydome Tent.

I realized that because the rainfly at the front of the Skydome tent is pretty short, it doesn’t offer quite as much rain protection, and a lot of water was flowing over the bottom part of the tent fabric, and the flooring seam, so there was some leaking.

Water flowing over the Skydome Tent. The red arrow is pointing to the vulnerable seam.
Water flowing over the Skydome Tent. The red arrow is pointing to the vulnerable seam.

At the other 3 sides of the tent, the length of the rainfly is a lot longer, and covers at least a good three-quarters of the tent body.

The other walls of the Coleman Skydome Tent. The rainfly is a lot longer.
The other walls of the Coleman Skydome Tent. The rainfly is a lot longer.

There was no leaking at all at these other 3 sides of the tent.

The length of the rainfly offers really good rain protection, and notice that the rainfall doesn’t touch the tent body as much, which was why there was no leaking, not even from the seam.

Water flowing almost straight to the ground because of the angle of the guy-ed out rainfly.
Water flowing almost straight to the ground because of the angle of the guy-ed out rainfly.

As for the mesh of the vents, the fabric of the tent body and the rainfly, at the other 3 walls of the tent, they were all dry.

This is me checking the damage in the Coleman Skydome Tent after the rain.
This is me checking the damage in the Coleman Skydome Tent after the rain.

Heavy Rain Test

I also managed to put this Coleman Skydome Tent through about 45 minutes of heavy rain, which looked like this.

The Coleman Skydome Tent in my yard in heavy rain.
The Coleman Skydome Tent in my yard in heavy rain.

After the rain stopped about 45 minutes later, I found quite a big puddle of water at the front of the tent:

The damage after 45 minutes of heavy rain.
The damage after 45 minutes of heavy rain.

Where did the leaking come from? You guessed it! It came through the un-taped bathtub flooring seam, again.

This seam of the Coleman Skydome Tent is the most vulnerable in rain.
This seam of the Coleman Skydome Tent is the most vulnerable in rain.

On top of that, I also found that the light blue fabric at the front of the tent was slightly damp from having been put through so much rainfall.

This part of the Coleman Skydome Tent was also slightly damp from the inside.
This part of the Coleman Skydome Tent was also slightly damp from the inside.

For the other 3 sides of the Skydome tent though, which had much longer rainflies, I found that the water didn’t get into my tent through the mesh, and there was also no leaking through the bathtub flooring seam or any of the fabric.

The Coleman Skydome Tent in super heavy rain.
The Coleman Skydome Tent in super heavy rain.

However, I did notice that this corner seam in the flooring was leaking a bit. Why? Because it wasn’t taped. So, despite the longer rainfly, it couldn’t hold up quite well.

Signs of leaking from another corner of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
Signs of leaking from another corner of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

These pictures really don’t do the rain test justice, so I highly recommend checking out my YouTube video on this rain test, right here:

Rainy Day Ventilation

During the heavy rain, at the front of the Skydome tent, I found the rainfly pole pretty useful in kind of like diverting the rainfall away from the window:

Water running over the Coleman Skydome Tent. This is a close-up of the rainfly pole too.
Water running over the Coleman Skydome Tent. This is a close-up of the rainfly pole too.

So, even though the rainfly length is pretty short, like so: …

This is the front of the Coleman Skydome Tent under heavy rain.
This is the front of the Coleman Skydome Tent under heavy rain.

… Notice that the water gets directed towards the 2 sides of the tent instead.

Water flowing towards the sides of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
Water flowing towards the sides of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

So, even after 45 minutes of heavy rain, my window mesh was mostly still dry.

The window mesh of my Coleman Skydome Tent was almost dry.
The window mesh of my Coleman Skydome Tent was almost dry.

The fabric below the window mesh was pretty damp though.

Water droplets on the fabric below the window.
Water droplets on the fabric below the window.

However, just bear in mind that this rain test happened in my yard with not a lot of wind. So, if the wind is heavier, you do have to shut the window.

Even if you have to shut the window, there will still be some airflow from these 3 large vents inside the tent, each spanning almost the entire length of the tent, which is nice.

One of the mesh wall vents inside the Coleman Skydome Tent.
One of the mesh wall vents inside the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Each of them also measures about 12 inches in width from the outside.

This is me measuring the longest width of the mesh wall vents from the outside of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is me measuring the longest width of the mesh wall vents from the outside of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

During the heavy rain, I could stake it out and leave it open, and no water got into my tent through this vent at all.

This is the mesh wall vent of the Coleman Skydome Tent in heavy rain.
This is the mesh wall vent of the Coleman Skydome Tent in heavy rain.

Hot Day Ventilation

On a hot day, you can take the rainfly off from the outside, and you’ll find that these “vents” are basically just large mesh walls. (Hence, why I call them “mesh wall vents”.)

This is a picture of me lying down inside the Coleman Skydome Tent without the rainfly.
This is a picture of me lying down inside the Coleman Skydome Tent without the rainfly.

It’s great for plenty of ventilation on a hot day, as well as for stargazing. But just bear in mind that there will be basically no privacy when the rainfly is off, because you can see right into the tent from almost every angle.  

This is what the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like without the rainfly.
This is what the Coleman Skydome Tent looks like without the rainfly.

Quality

Flooring Material

The flooring of this Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent is made of polyethylene, and the bathtub feature extends up to about 6.5 inches.

This is a picture of a tape measure measuring the height of the bathtub flooring of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of a tape measure measuring the height of the bathtub flooring of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Even after 45 minutes of heavy pouring rain, no water seeped through the flooring itself.

Rain pouring over the bathtub flooring of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
Rain pouring over the bathtub flooring of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Tent Body Material

The rest of the tent is made of polyester, and I noticed that the light blue fabric at the front of the tent was slightly damp from having been put through 45 minutes of heavy rain.

A close-up shot of the tent body of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A close-up shot of the tent body of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Seam Taping

While the seams on the rainfly were taped, most of the seams inside the tent were not taped, and were only inverted, like this light blue tent fabric to bathtub flooring seam:

A close-up shot of the bathtub flooring seam.
A close-up shot of the bathtub flooring seam.

Another example is the entire door seam – it’s inverted too, and also not taped.

A close-up shot of the door seam in the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A close-up shot of the door seam in the Coleman Skydome Tent.

A minority of seams were taped, like this light blue to dark blue fabric seam near the bottom of the tent:

Some seam taping in the Coleman Skydome Tent.
Some seam taping in the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Stitching

I did find these seams to be pretty good quality and double-stitched, though I did find just one loose thread, which can be easily cut away.

A single loose thread in the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A single loose thread in the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Mesh

The mesh is just regular mesh, not no-see-um mesh, and it’s decent quality.

A close-up shot of the mesh quality in the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A close-up shot of the mesh quality in the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Zippers

These Coleman zippers are pretty good quality. Both my window and door zippers were catch-free with no real snagging issues.

A close-up shot of the door zippers in the Coleman Skydome Tent.
A close-up shot of the door zippers in the Coleman Skydome Tent.

However, I noticed that the rain cover outside the tent sometimes gets in the way of the door zippers, making it appear more “snaggy” than it actually is.

The rain cover from the outside getting in the way of the door zippers.
The rain cover from the outside getting in the way of the door zippers.

So, when zipping the door up from the inside, I have to push the rain cover out when zipping.

This is a picture of me pushing the door and rain cover out of the way, so that it doesn't snag the zippers.
This is a picture of me pushing the door and rain cover out of the way, so that it doesn’t snag the zippers.

And from the outside, I do hold the rain cover away from the zippers.

Poles

All the poles of this Skydome Tent are made of fiberglass, including the rainfly pole.

One of the fiberglass poles of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
One of the fiberglass poles of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Portability

Packed Size

This Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent has a packed size of 25 by 9 by 9 inches, and here’s what it looks like beside a Coleman 2-Person Sundome Tent and a 32-ounce Nalgene bottle for a size comparison.

From left to right: Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent, Coleman Sundome 2-Person Tent, 32-ounce Nalgene bottle.
From left to right: Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent, Coleman Sundome 2-Person Tent, 32-ounce Nalgene bottle.

Weight

The Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent weighs about 10.4 lbs for everything, including all stakes and guylines.

Here's a picture of me holding a packed-up Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.
Here’s a picture of me holding a packed-up Coleman Skydome 4-Person Tent.

Pros and Cons

Pros

For pros, I really like the extra big door, which is a whopping 4 feet in length, and makes getting gear in and out of the tent super convenient.

This is a picture of me exiting the Coleman Skydome Tent through the door.
This is a picture of me exiting the Coleman Skydome Tent through the door.

I also liked that this Skydome Tent has more storage options than your average Coleman tent, with not 1, but 2 pretty big pockets, and also a provided gear loft.

Another pro is that hot day ventilation with the rainfly off is great, with lots of mesh walls, and rainy-day ventilation is also good because with the rainfly in place, the mesh walls become vents for some airflow.

I guess another pro is the 20% more headroom. I didn’t know how to test or measure this, but it definitely does have slightly more space than a regular Sundome. I wouldn’t say that the difference is super noticeable though.

The carry bag of the Coleman Skydome Tent features a '5-minute set up' and '20% more headroom'.
The carry bag of the Coleman Skydome Tent features a ‘5-minute set up’ and ‘20% more headroom’.

Cons

As for cons, I think the biggest one is that rain protection can definitely be better, and Coleman should at least have taped the bathtub flooring seam, because it’s usually always the first place to leak. Also, the rainfly pole should have provided a little more shading over the door, so that water doesn’t drip right into the tent when you open the door after the rain has stopped.

Also, while there’s enough livable space to lounge around inside the tent, this 4-Person Skydome doesn’t give you enough space to stand up.

This is a picture of me sitting on some sleeping pads in the Coleman Skydome Tent.
This is a picture of me sitting on some sleeping pads in the Coleman Skydome Tent.

I also found the pre-attached poles kind of silly. It’s only pre-attached to the back of the tent, so you still have to put the entire pole together, and then secure the other end, which is the more difficult part! So, Coleman basically pre-attached the easiest part of the set up.

And this pre-attachment makes cleaning and packing up slightly more difficult, because you can’t remove the poles from tent body.

Also, this Skydome is supposed to be a quick pitch in under 5 minutes, but that’s not really accurate. The Skydome 4-Person Tent itself took me almost 10 minutes for the entire set up.

Also, the Skydome Tent that I got was defective. You know these pole pockets at the front of the tent? Yeah, Coleman sewed mine on the wrong way.

I had to take the stitches out on my own to be able to use the tent!
I had to take the stitches out on my own to be able to use the tent!

They sewed the top up, when they were actually supposed to sew the bottom part. (Notice how the little black ball goes all the way through the pole pocket?)

So, I had to take out the stitches on my own, and use a couple of binder clips to seal the bottom part of the pocket as a temporary solution.

I also didn’t really like how much tension there was on each of these pole clips, look how tightly it’s pulling on the mesh tent body.

The pole clips of the Coleman Skydome Tent.
The pole clips of the Coleman Skydome Tent.

Recommendation

Overall, after using the Coleman Sundome Tent, I’m not really impressed with this Coleman Skydome Tent. Especially with the not-so-accurate claims of a 5 minute set up.

Both the Sundome and the Skydome Tents set up in about the same time, and the Sundome’s rain protection is actually a little bit better, and can take 30 minutes of heavy rain instead of 15 minutes of heavy rain like the Skydome.

Bonus: Must Read!

For a more in-depth comparison on how this Skydome Tent compares to other Coleman tents, like the Sundome Tent, you can check out this blog post right here: I Tested the 14 Best Coleman Tents!

This is the thumbnail I used for my 14 Best Coleman Tents video. From left to right: Coleman Instant Cabin 4-Person Tent, Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, and Coleman Sundome 6-Person Tent.
This is the thumbnail I used for my 14 Best Coleman Tents video. From left to right: Coleman Instant Cabin 4-Person Tent, Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, and Coleman Sundome 6-Person Tent.

Or, check out the Coleman Skydome Tent:

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