I Bought & Tested the 6 Best 10-Person Tents (2022)

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For this review, I bought and tested these 6 BEST 10-person tents:

  1. Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent;
  2. Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent;
  3. Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent;
  4. Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent;
  5. Core Equipment 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent; and
  6. Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me testing out 4 of my 6 best 10-person tents. From left to right, the Coleman 10-Person Instant Dark Room Tent, the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Cabin Tent, and the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. (Not pictured: Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Tent and Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent).
This is a picture of me testing out 4 of my 6 best 10-person tents. From left to right, the Coleman 10-Person Instant Dark Room Tent, the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Cabin Tent, and the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. (Not pictured: Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Tent and Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent).

Summary

Here’s a summary of all the 10-person tents that I recommend (after buying and testing, of course):

10P Tent Recommendation Score Price
BEST PREMIUM PICK
Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent
  • Peak height: 80 inches
  • Base area: 138.0 square feet
  • Flooring: 150D Polyester (2,000mm)
  • Tent body: 75D Polyester (800mm)
  • Zippers: SBS
  • Mesh: No-see-um
  • 1-hour heavy rain test: No leaks
  • 2 pull-out windows
  • Pre-attached full-length divider
  • Humongous T-door (91 by 55 inches)
8.5
8.5 / 10
BEST VALUE FOR MONEY
Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent
  • Peak height: 80.5 inches
  • Base area: 143.6 square feet
  • Hinged D-door
  • 2 angled windows (60 by 17.5 inches)
  • Inexpensive
  • Good quality
7.7
7.7 / 10
BEST INSTANT PICK
Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Tent
  • Peak height: 77.5 inches
  • Base area: 135.8 square feet
  • 6 minute set up (2 people)
  • 12 minute set up (1 person)
  • Big T-door (72 by 51 inches)
  • 3 massive doors in total
  • Pre-attached full-length divider
  • Extra large vent (59 by 11 inches)
  • 6 extended eaves
8.3
8.3 / 10
BEST BLACK OUT PICK
Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent
  • Peak height: 73.5 inches
  • Base area: 135.7 square feet
  • Phenomenal dark room tech
  • Hinged D-door
  • 7.5 minute set up (2 people)
  • 16 minute set up (1 person)
7.6
7.6 / 10
MOST SPACIOUS
Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent
  • Peak height: 90 inches
  • Lowest height: 65 inches
  • Base area: 135.8 square feet
  • Insane peak height
  • Vertical side walls
  • 1-hour light rain test: No leaks
  • Awesome colors
7.4
7.4 / 10
BUDGET PICK
Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent
  • Peak height: 88 inches
  • Lowest height: 65 inches
  • Base area: 136.4 square feet
  • Very spacious
  • Super inexpensive
6.2
6.2 / 10

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All the 10-person tents that I bought and tested:

10P TentFull ReviewCheck Price
Columbia 10PRead ReviewAmazon
WeatherMaster 10PRead ReviewAmazon
Outdoor Products 10PRead ReviewAmazon
Coleman Instant 10PRead ReviewAmazon
Core 10P Read ReviewAmazon
Ozark Trail 10PRead ReviewAmazon

This is a picture of some of my best 10-person tents (packed up) in my yard. From left to right: Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent (black with red straps), Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent (blue), Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent (gray), Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent (black), Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Tent (green). The smaller tent in front is a Coleman 2-Person Sundome Tent.
This is a picture of some of my best 10-person tents (packed up) in my yard. From left to right: Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent (black with red straps), Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent (blue), Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent (gray), Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent (black), Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Tent (green). The smaller tent in front is a Coleman 2-Person Sundome Tent.

*These are my measured specifications and data of the 6 best 10-person tents, and may differ from the brand’s marketed specifications:

10P Tent Peak Height Base Area Packed Size Weight Set Up (1P) Take Down (1P)
Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent 80 inches 138.0 square feet 30 x 14 x 12 inches 34.4 pounds 28 minutes 16 minutes
Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent 80.5 inches 143.6 square feet 31 by 18 by 12 inches 30.6 pounds 19 minutes 16 minutes
Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Tent 77.5 inches 135.8 square feet 50 by 17 by 12 inches 32.8 pounds 12 minutes 8.5 minutes
Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent 73.5 inches 135.7 square feet 50 by 17 by 12 inches ~31 pounds 16 minutes 10 minutes
Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent 90 inches 135.8 square feet 29 x 16 x 12 inches 30.5 pounds 22 minutes 13 minutes
Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent 88 inches 136.4 square feet 29 by 18 by 13 inches 30.0 pounds 20 minutes 12 minutes

If you need more info on the specifications of each 10-person tent, click here for the more detailed tables.

I spent over $1,500 buying these 6 best 10-person tents, 6 weeks testing them out, and another 2 months after that putting this review together.

Over these 6 weeks of intensive testing, I set up and took down each 10-person tent at least half a dozen times, rain tested each one thoroughly, slept in one of tents every single night, amongst other things.

After all that, here’s how I scored each of the six 10-person tents (10 is the best, 1 is the worst):

10P TentOverall Rating
Columbia 10P8.5
Outdoor Products 10P8.3
WeatherMaster 10P7.7
Coleman Instant 10P7.6
Core 10P7.4
Ozark Trail 10P6.2

Top Picks

1. Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent (Best Premium Tent)

This is a picture of my Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Cabin Tent in my yard.
This is a picture of my Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Cabin Tent in my yard.
5
Ease of Use
9.3
Spaciousness
8.3
Comfort & Features
9.5
Ventilation
9
Rain Protection
10
Quality
5
Portability
Overall Score 8.5 / 10

Key Info

  • Peak Height: 80 inches
  • Length: 13 feet 11 inches
  • Width: 9 feet 11 inches
  • Base Area: 138.0 square feet
  • Material: 150D Polyester (Flooring), 75D Polyester (Tent and Rainfly), Fiberglass and steel (Poles), SBS (Zippers), No-see-um (Mesh)
  • Packed size: 30 x 14 x 12 inches
  • Weight: 34.4 pounds
  • Storage: 2 pockets, 2 lantern loops
  • Ventilation: 4 windows, 2 doors, 1 ground vent, ceiling mesh
  • Other Features: Pull-out windows (2), Room divider (1), E-port (1)
  • Set Up Timing: 14 minutes (2 people), 28 minutes (1 person, not recommended)
  • Take Down Timing: 8.5 minutes (2 people), 16 minutes (1 person)

Pros and Cons

Feature-rich (2 pull-out windows, full-length divider, humongous T-door)
Good water protection
Superb quality and design
Takes a few more minutes to set up, needs minimum of 2 people
Expensive

Summary

Of all my 10-person tents, the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent is my highest quality, most feature-rich, most water-resistant, most ventilated tent. How so? Well, here’s a quick summary.

This Columbia 10-Person Tent did the best in my rain test, and passed my 1-hour heavy rain test with flying colors.

This is the result after the 1-hour rain test on the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent – completely dry.
This is the result after the 1-hour rain test on the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent – completely dry.

Plus, it has the most ventilation when it’s raining (with not just 2 pull-out windows, but with 1 ground vent as well) and is my only tent that came with all its seams taped.

This is a picture of one of my pull-out windows of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent open in the rain.
This is a picture of one of my pull-out windows of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent open in the rain.

This Columbia T-door is the biggest door in any of my 10-person tents, and the divider is full length with no gaps at all.

This is a picture of me ducking to get through the T-door of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me ducking to get through the T-door of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.

To top it all off, the quality is superb, from the crunch-free 150D polyester flooring to the super smooth SBS zippers.

The design is so thoughtful as well – both doors come rain protected on both the outside and inside, it has the most guylines (10 of them) of any of my 10-person tents, and the most poles and pole clips for the most livable space possible.

This is a picture of me attaching the 2 additional steel poles to the roof of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of my brother attaching the 2 additional steel poles to the roof of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. The Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent has 6 roof poles, double that of the average 10-person tent.

With all these extra features, it’s no wonder that the Columbia is my 10-person tent that takes the longest to set up. It’s also the most expensive 10-person tent that I paid for. But hey, if you need an all-in-one 10-person tent for any occasion, rain or shine, this Columbia 10-Person Tent has got you covered.

More info on the Columbia Mammoth Creek:

2. Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent (Best Value for Money)

This is a picture of me standing in my Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me standing in my Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
7
Ease of Use
9
Spaciousness
8
Comfort & Features
7.5
Ventilation
7
Rain Protection
9.2
Quality
5
Portability
Overall Score 7.7 / 10

Key Info

  • Peak Height: 80.5 inches
  • Longest Length: 16 feet 8 inches
  • Longest Width: 9 feet 1 inch
  • Base Area: 143.6 square feet
  • Material: Polyethylene (Flooring), 68D Polyester (Tent), 75D Polyester Taffeta (Rainfly), Steel and Fiberglass (Poles)
  • Packed size: 31 by 18 by 12 inches
  • Weight: 30.6 pounds
  • Storage: 4 pockets, 1 lantern loop
  • Ventilation: 4 windows, 2 doors, ceiling mesh
  • Other Features: Angled windows (2), Hinged door (1), Room divider (1), E-port (1)
  • Set Up Timing: 10 minutes (2 people), 19 minutes (1 person)
  • Take Down Timing: 8.5 minutes (2 people), 16 minutes (1 person)

Pros and Cons

Lots of features (2 angled windows, 1 hinged D-door)
Good quality and durability
Inexpensive
Needs seam sealing
Carry bag a bit tight

Summary

I’ve had the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent for about 3 years now, and it’s still in great condition, which speaks volumes about its durability and quality.

On top of that, the WeatherMaster Tent has tons of great features, like a super user-friendly hinged D-door, as well as 2 huge angled windows on both widths of the tent.

This is a picture of me ducking to get through the hinged D-door of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me ducking to get through the hinged D-door of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

And here’s the cherry on top – it’s actually very inexpensive, especially considering the features that you get. Plus, the WeatherMaster Tent scored almost as well as my more expensive tents, yet cost me a whopping ~40% less.

This is a picture of the rain avoiding the angled windows of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of the rain avoiding the angled windows of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

It’s the 10-person tent that I used the most often over the past few years, and I certainly got my money’s worth out of it.

If you’re expecting rain though, you’d need to seam seal the inverted seam connecting the tent body to the bathtub flooring (see picture below).

This is a picture of me touching the damp seam that the water was leaking through during my rain test of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me touching the damp seam that the water was leaking through during my rain test of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

More info on the WeatherMaster Tent:

3. Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (Best Instant Tent)

This is a picture of my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent in my yard while it was raining.
This is a picture of my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent in my yard while it was raining.
10
Ease of Use
9
Spaciousness
9.3
Comfort & Features
7
Ventilation
8
Rain Protection
9.2
Quality
3
Portability
Overall Score 8.3 / 10

Key Info

  • Peak height: 77.5 inches
  • Length: 13 feet 7 inches
  • Width: 10 feet
  • Base Area: 135.8 square feet
  • Material: Polyethylene (Flooring), 68D Polyester (Tent and Rainfly), Steel (Poles), No-see-um (Mesh)
  • Packed size: 50 by 17 by 12 inches
  • Weight: 32.8 pounds
  • Storage: 2 pockets, 4 lantern loops
  • Ventilation: 3 windows, 3 doors, 1 ground vent, ceiling mesh
  • Other Features: Pre-attached poles and pole clips, Room divider (1), E-port (1)
  • Set Up Timing: 6 minutes (2 people), 12 minutes (1 person)
  • Take Down Timing: 4.25 minutes (2 people), 8.5 minutes (1 person)

Pros and Cons

Fastest set up, take down, and pack up
High quality instant mechanism
Feature-rich
Big packed size

Summary

This Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Tent has an extremely easy and fast set up. It only took my brother and I 6 minutes to set it up completely, and by myself, it was only 12 minutes. That’s incredible for a 10-person tent.

This is a picture of me setting up the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin tent on my own.
This is a picture of me setting up the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin tent on my own.

Even packing the tent up was easy, and air didn’t get trapped inside when stuffing it back into the bag.

This is a picture of my brother stuffing the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent body back into the carry bag.
This is a picture of my brother stuffing the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent body back into the carry bag.

The entire instant tent mechanism is high quality, with 3 hubs for more livable space, and even these extended eaves that hold the rainfly away from the tent body.

This is what one of the extended eaves of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like, with the rainfly in place.
This is what one of the extended eaves of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like, with the rainfly in place.

On top of that, this Outdoor Products Tent has awesome features, like a whopping 3 doors, 1 of which is a huge T-door, and even a full-length room divider for privacy.

This is a picture of all 3 doors inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of all 3 doors inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

Just bear in mind that instant tents have a much bigger packed size than traditional tents of the same capacity.

Here’s what the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Tent looks (~50 inches long) like compared to regular 10-person tents (~30 inches long). Quite a bit bigger, huh?

This is a picture of what my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like compared to other non-instant traditional 10-person tents for a packed size comparison. The red arrow is pointing to the Outdoor Products Tent.
This is a picture of what my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like compared to other non-instant traditional 10-person tents for a packed size comparison. The red arrow is pointing to the Outdoor Products Tent.

More info on the Outdoor Products Tent:

4. Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (Best Blackout Tent)

This is a picture of me standing in front of my Coleman 10-Person Dark Room Instant Cabin Tent in my yard.
This is a picture of me standing in front of my Coleman 10-Person Dark Room Instant Cabin Tent in my yard.
9
Ease of Use
7.7
Spaciousness
8.3
Comfort & Features
7.5
Ventilation
7
Rain Protection
7.8
Quality
3
Portability
Overall Score 7.6 / 10

Key Info

  • Peak Height: 73.5 inches
  • Length: 13 feet 11 inches
  • Width: 9 feet 9 inches
  • Base Area: 135.7 square feet
  • Material: Polyethylene (Flooring), Polyester (Tent and Rainfly), Steel (Poles)
  • Packed size: 50 by 17 by 12 inches
  • Weight: ~31 pounds
  • Storage: 2 pockets, 1 lantern loop
  • Ventilation: 5 windows, 2 doors, ceiling mesh
  • Other Features: Pre-attached poles and pole clips, Hinged door (1), Room divider (1), E-port (1), Dark room technology
  • Set Up Timing: 7.5 minutes (2 people), 16 minutes (1 person)
  • Take Down Timing: 5 minutes (2 people), 10 minutes (1 person)

Pros and Cons

Fast set up and take down
Phenomenal dark-room tech
Tons of ventilation on hot days
Lots of features
Below average livable space
Minimal ventilation when raining
Needs seam sealing

Summary

The Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent sets up anywhere between 30 to 90% faster than traditional tents. While it’s slightly slower than the Outdoor Products Tent (above), that’s because the Coleman Tent comes with this hinged D-door that you need to install with fiberglass poles, which is super user-friendly for going in and out of the tent:

This is a picture of me reaching for the handle of the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me reaching for the handle of the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

On top of that, there are 2 other ways that this Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent blows all the other 10-person tents in this review out of the water.

First, the dark room technology is phenomenal. Not only is it a lot darker inside the tent during the day, it’s also a lot cooler as well, so it’s great for sleeping in.

This is a picture of the dark room technology black-out feature of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of the dark room technology black-out feature of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

And second, it has a whopping 5 windows and 2 doors with humongous mesh panels, so you’d get an estimated ~9,400 square inches of ventilation when they’re all open on a hot day, which is the most of all these 10-person tents.

In this picture, you can see the different sized windows of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, and that’s me in the picture opening up all the windows. (From left to right: mesh of hinged door, window beside hinged door, biggest window, and second biggest window).
In this picture, you can see the different sized windows of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, and that’s me in the picture opening up all the windows. (From left to right: mesh of hinged door, window beside hinged door, biggest window, and second biggest window).

Unfortunately though, this Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent has the least livable space of all these 10-person tents. Its peak height of 73.5 inches is lower than all the other 10-person tents, the tent body feels a bit droopy on the widths of the tent, and the side walls aren’t as vertical as I expected them to be.

This is a picture of me stretching my arm out to reach the peak height (73.5 inches) of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me stretching my arm out to reach the peak height (73.5 inches) of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

But as long as you’re not trying to pack 10 people into this tent, you’re good to go. (I think it would fit 6 comfortably.)

Also, if you’re expecting any rain at all, you do need to seal this inverted seam.

I noticed that the inverted seam connecting the black fabric of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent to the bathtub flooring was leaking.
I noticed that the inverted seam connecting the black fabric of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent to the bathtub flooring was leaking.

And there won’t be much ventilation when it’s raining, cos you’d need to close all the windows, and there are no vents.

That being said, I’d highly recommend this Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent for hot summer days with high temperatures, but not if you’re expecting plenty of rain.

More info on the Coleman 10-Person Instant:

5. Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent (Most Spacious)

This is the Core Equipment 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent in my yard.
This is the Core Equipment 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent in my yard.
7
Ease of Use
9.7
Spaciousness
7
Comfort & Features
7
Ventilation
7
Rain Protection
8.3
Quality
5
Portability
Overall Score 7.4 / 10

Key Info

  • Peak Height: 90 inches
  • Length: 13 feet 7 inches
  • Width: 10 feet
  • Base Area: 135.8 square feet
  • Material: Polyethylene (Flooring), 68D Polyester (Tent and Rainfly), Steel and Fiberglass (Poles), 210D Polyester (Carry Bag)
  • Packed size: 29 x 16 x 12 inches
  • Weight: 30.5 pounds
  • Storage: 2 pockets, 1 lantern loop, 1 gear loft
  • Ventilation: 4 windows, 2 doors, 2 ground vents, ceiling mesh
  • Other Features: Room divider (1), E-port (1)
  • Set Up Timing: 11 minutes (2 people), 22 minutes (1 person)
  • Take Down Timing: 7 minutes (2 people), 13 minutes (1 person)

Pros and Cons

Super spacious
Great in light rain
Awesome colors
Average in the rest of my tests (except spaciousness)

Summary

I really enjoyed the spaciousness of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent. It has the highest and most impressive peak height of all these 10-person tents, coming in at 90 inches, which is great especially for taller people.

This is a picture of me stretching my arm out to try and reach the top of Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, which is 90 inches high.
This is a picture of me stretching my arm out to try and reach the top of Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, which is 90 inches high.

Even the lowest height in the Core 10-Person Tent, which is at the 4 corners, is a whopping 65 inches. This is taller than my entire height! I’m only 5’3″, and I could stand up straight even right at the corner of the tent.

This is a picture of me standing at the corners of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, which is about 65 inches high.
This is a picture of me standing at the corners of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, which is about 65 inches high.

The problem here though is that if you’re not as tall though, like me, you’d have trouble reaching the gear loft and the lantern loop at the top. But hey, having too much space is a good problem to have right?

This is a picture of me attaching the gear loft and the divider of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent at the same time. (I’m not tall so I’m standing on a Coleman bench.)
This is a picture of me attaching the gear loft and the divider of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent at the same time. (I’m not tall so I’m standing on a Coleman bench.)

With its near vertical side walls, the Core 10-Person Cabin Tent is easily the tent with the most livable space for sure.

This picture shows that the side walls of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent is almost vertical.
This picture shows that the side walls of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent is almost vertical.

It also comes in a very nice color, not only in the day but at night too. The Core Tent is also great in light rain, and went through 1 hour of light rain with no leaks at all.

Overall, the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin is a great all-rounder tent with no obvious flaws. But apart from spaciousness, compared to the rest of my other 10-person tents, the Core 10-Person Tent came in only about average for the rest of the tests (like ventilation, rain + more).

But if spaciousness is your priority, the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent is the perfect fit for you.

More info on the Core 10-Person:

6. Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent (Budget Pick)

This is a picture of me opening the door to my Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent in my yard.
This is a picture of me opening the door to my Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent in my yard.
7
Ease of Use
9.7
Spaciousness
5.3
Comfort & Features
5.5
Ventilation
5
Rain Protection
6.3
Quality
5
Portability
Overall Score 6.2 / 10

Key Info

  • Peak Height: 88 inches
  • Length: 13 feet 9 inches
  • Width: 9 feet 11 inches
  • Base Area: 136.4 square feet
  • Material: Polyethylene (Flooring), 68D Polyester (Tent and Rainfly), Steel and Fiberglass (Poles)
  • Packed size: 29 by 18 by 13 inches
  • Weight: 30.0 pounds
  • Storage: 2 pockets, 1 lantern loop, 1 gear loft
  • Ventilation: 5 windows, 1 door, ceiling mesh
  • Other Features: Room divider (1), E-port (1)
  • Set Up Timing: 10 minutes (2 people), 20 minutes (1 person)
  • Take Down Timing: 6.5 minutes (2 people), 12 minutes (1 person)

Pros and Cons

VERY inexpensive
Very spacious
Minimal ventilation when raining
Minimal weather protection
Quality not the best

Summary

If you’re on a tight budget and can’t afford to shell out more than ~$100 on a 10-person tent, the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent is worth checking out. It is, by far, my least expensive tent for the size. And it even comes with a gear loft and room divider.

This is a picture of me standing on a Coleman bench to put up the gear loft, of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, because I’m not tall enough.
This is a picture of me standing on a Coleman bench to put up the gear loft, of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, because I’m not tall enough.

I paid slightly over $100 for the Ozark Trail 10-Person Tent that I tested in this review, but do take note of a few things.

The quality of Ozark Trail tents aren’t the best, and this Ozark tent was no different, with slightly sticky walls, loose threads, mesh runs, and door snagging.

This is one of the loose threads that I found near one of the the window zippers in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is one of the loose threads that I found near one of the the window zippers in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.

It also offers the least protection against rain, leaking within just 15 minutes of light rain, the least ventilation when raining, and has only a single door.

This is a picture of me touching the leaky seam in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me touching the leaky seam in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.

But other than that, you can certainly use the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent on sunny days, and it’s super spacious with a nice high peak height of 88 inches. You can’t get any other brand of tent at this price, for sure.

This is a picture of me (5’3″) standing upright and stretching my arm out to the very top of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, which has a peak height of 88 inches.
This is a picture of me (5’3″) standing upright and stretching my arm out to the very top of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, which has a peak height of 88 inches.

More info on the Ozark Trail 10-Person Tent:

Recommendation Summary

Here’s a quick summary of all the 10-person tents that I bought and tested for this review:

If you’d like to compare how each of the six best 10-person tents performed in each test, here’s a cool graphic where you can do so:

All the test scores of all the six best 10-person tents.
All the test scores of all the six best 10-person tents.

For more info on how I tested each 10-person tent, and came up with these scores, I’ll explain all of it in detail in the next section.

How I Tested My 10-Person Tents

I put each 10-person tent through 7 different tests:

  1. Ease of Use
  2. Spaciousness
  3. Comfort and Features
  4. Ventilation
  5. Weather Protection
  6. Quality
  7. Portability

At the end of all the tests, I compiled all the data and came to a decision in the Overall Performance Section.

Ease of Use

For ease of use, I looked at how easily I could set up, as well as take down and pack up, all of these 10-person tents.

Set Up (2-person)

When I set up each 10-person tent with my brother, here’s how long each tent took us to set up (in minutes), including staking and guying out the tents:

10P Tent2P Set Up Timing
Outdoor Products 10P6 minutes
Coleman Instant 10P7.5 minutes
WeatherMaster 10P10 minutes
Ozark Trail 10P10 minutes
Core 10P11 minutes
Columbia 10P14 minutes

The 2 fastest 10-person tents were the Outdoor Products Instant Tent and the Coleman Instant Cabin Tent. They were both super user-friendly, especially the Outdoor Products tent.

This is a picture of my brother extending one of the telescoping wall poles of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of my brother extending one of the telescoping wall poles of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

The Coleman Instant Tent took slightly longer to set up mainly because of this extra step of installing these green-colored fiberglass poles for the hinged D-door, which takes about 1 minute for 2 people.

This is a picture of my brother and I inserting the green-colored fiberglass poles to install the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of my brother and I inserting the green-colored fiberglass poles to install the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

Of the 4 non-instant tents, I found the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent to be the easiest to set up, mainly because there are only 3 roof poles to insert into these short and pretty much snag-free pole sleeves. And it’s color-coded too!

This is a picture of my brother pointing to the red band on one of the steel poles of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. Notice that the pole sleeve in the middle is red in color for easy identification.
This is a picture of my brother pointing to the red band on one of the steel poles of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. Notice that the pole sleeve in the middle is red in color for easy identification.

There are 6 of these straight poles for the walls, which is the same as all the other tents.

After assembly, here’s what all of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent’s steel poles look like. I put a red box around the 3 curved steel poles, because you need to set those up first.
After assembly, here’s what all of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent’s steel poles look like. I put a red box around the 3 curved steel poles, because you need to set those up first.

There are 4 fiberglass poles, 2 for the angled windows that you need to set up, and 2 for the hinged D-door.

This is what all the 4 fiberglass poles of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent will look like when assembled.
This is what all the 4 fiberglass poles of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent will look like when assembled.

The next easiest tent to set up is the Ozark Trail 10-Person Tent, which also has 3 roof poles. But, the pole sleeves are a lot longer, and also the roof poles are not color-coded.

This is a picture of the roof of my Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent with all the fiberglass poles inserted into the roof pole sleeves (both green and blue).
This is a picture of the roof of my Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent with all the fiberglass poles inserted into the roof pole sleeves.

Like all the other tents, there are 6 steel poles for the walls. To stake and guy out the tent, there are 14 steel stakes.

This is a picture of me assembling all the 3 fiberglass roof poles and the 6 steel wall poles of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me assembling all the 3 fiberglass roof poles and the 6 steel wall poles of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent.

The Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent has almost the exact same design and set up as the Ozark Trail Tent, with 3 color-coded roof poles and 6 wall poles.

This is a picture of the 6 steel poles, as well as the 3 fiberglass poles (2 black and 1 gray), that came with the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of the 6 steel poles, as well as the 3 fiberglass poles (2 black and 1 gray), that came with the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

It took slightly longer to set up because it has 6 extra stakes for the ground vents and doors, so 20 stakes in total.

This is a picture of the 20 stakes that comes with the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of the 20 stakes that comes with the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

Lastly, we have the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent, with not 3, but 6 roof poles.

This is what the roof of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent will look like when all the fiberglass roof poles have been inserted through the color pole sleeves.
This is what the roof of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent will look like when all the 4 fiberglass roof poles have been inserted through the color pole sleeves. I haven’t installed the 2 other steel poles yet.

It also has 2 additional pole clips, 10 guylines, and 2 angled windows, which you need to set up from the inside of the tent.

This is a picture of the pull-out windows and guylines of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent.
This is a picture of the pull-out windows and guylines of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent.

Set Up (1-Person)

I also tried my best to set each 10-person tent up on my own, and here are the timings:

10P Tent1P Set Up2P Set Up
Outdoor Products 10P12 mins6 mins
Coleman Instant 10P16 mins7.5 mins
WeatherMaster 10P19 mins10 mins
Ozark Trail 10P20 mins10 mins
Core 10P22 mins11 mins
Columbia 10P28 mins*14 mins

The 1-person set up timing is roughly double the time of the 2-person timing, give or take. But here are a few things to take note of.

I’m about 5’3″ (~63 inches or 160 cm), so because of the high peak heights of these tents, I could not put the rainfly on for the Ozark, Core and Outdoor Products 10-Person Tents.

This is a picture of me trying and failing to put the rainfly on the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent on my own.
This is a picture of me trying and failing to put the rainfly on the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent on my own.

Also, for the Ozark, Core and Columbia 10-Person Tents, these tents come with these elbow or pole connectors, which I felt was a humongous pain to set up by myself.

This is a picture of me holding one of the pole joints of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent. You can see the small protrusions inside the pole joint.
This is a picture of me holding one of the pole joints (or pole connectors) of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

Because the roof of these tents are supposed to be propped up, it’s very difficult to get the poles to arch the correct way on your own.

This is the roof of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent after all 3 fiberglass roof poles have been inserted into their respective elbow connectors.
This is the roof of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent after all 3 fiberglass roof poles have been inserted into their respective elbow connectors.

Not impossible, because I’ve done it, but difficult. If the poles arch the wrong way, you’ll get an inverted roof, like this, which is super annoying.

This is a picture of me struggling with the inverted roof of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me struggling with the inverted roof of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

So, I highly recommend getting someone else to go inside the tent to set up it much more easily, and also so you won’t put too much stress on the fiberglass poles.

This is a picture of my brother climbing through the door of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent to go inside the tent, so I can insert the fiberglass poles into the pole joints more easily.
This is a picture of my brother climbing through the door of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent to go inside the tent, so I can insert the fiberglass poles into the pole joints more easily.

For the Columbia 10-Person Tent, I couldn’t even get the blue fiberglass roof poles into these pole connectors on my own, and almost broke my pole trying to.

This is a picture of a small crack down the length of my fiberglass pole when I tried putting the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent up on my own.
This is a picture of a small crack down the length of my fiberglass pole when I tried putting the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent up on my own.

The bottom line is that the only 2 tents that I could put up on my own, is the Coleman Instant 10-Person Cabin Tent, and the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. If you’re a bit taller than me, the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent will be a breeze to put up as well.

This is a picture of me setting up the guylines of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. I had set up the entire tent on my own.
This is a picture of me setting up the guylines of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. I had set up the entire tent on my own.

Ease of Take Down

For ease of take down, here are the timings starting from the fastest to take down and pack up:

10P Tent2P Take Down1P Take Down
Outdoor Products 10P4.25 mins8.5 mins
Coleman Instant 10P5 mins*10 mins*
Ozark Trail 10P6.5 mins12 mins
Core 10P7 mins13 mins
WeatherMaster 10P8.5 mins16 mins
Columbia 10P8.5 mins16 mins

*I put an asterisk for the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, because it’s an estimated timing. I did take down the entire tent, but I did not pack it up into the carry bag, because there was a manufacturing defect, and it couldn’t fit back in.

But my Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent fit back in very easily, and is exactly the same size.

This is a picture showing the cardboard packaging of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent (top) and the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (bottom). Both are exactly the same size.
This is a picture showing the cardboard packaging of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent (top) and the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (bottom). Both are exactly the same size.
This is a picture of my brother stuffing the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent body back into the carry bag.
This is a picture of my brother stuffing the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent body back into the carry bag.

On top of that, this Coleman carry bag can be expanded by ripping the bottom of the bag off.

The bottom of the carry bag of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent can be removed, in order to expand the bag for an easier pack up.
The bottom of the carry bag of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent can be removed, in order to expand the bag for an easier pack up.

When I sent the Coleman tent back to Amazon, it wasn’t that difficult to fit everything back in, but I forgot to time it.

This is a picture of what my Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looked like when I sent it back to Amazon (because of the manufacturing defect).
This is a picture of what my Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looked like when I sent it back to Amazon (because of the manufacturing defect).

Also, the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent took slightly longer than I expected because it was quite a tight fit to stuff everything back into the carry bag. It was a much tighter fit than the rest of my 10-person non-instant tents.

This is a picture of me trying to stuff everything back into the carry bag of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me trying to stuff everything back into the carry bag of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

One last thing for this section – All these timings are based on me having set up and taken down each tent at least half a dozen times.

Ease of Use Ratings

So, based on the ease of set up and take down by not only 1 person, but 2 people as well, I rated the ease of use of each 10person tent (out of 10, with 10 being the easiest to set up).

Here are those ratings in chart form:

Chart by Visualizer

And also in table form:

10P TentEase of Use Ratings
Outdoor Products 10P10.0
Coleman Instant 10P9.0
WeatherMaster 10P7.0
Ozark Trail 10P7.0
Core 10P7.0
Columbia 10P5.0

Spaciousness

For spaciousness, I looked at the peak height, slope of the walls, and the base area of each 10-person tent in this review.

Peak Height

Here’s the peak height of each 10-person tent from the highest to lowest:

10P TentPeak Height
Core 10P90 inches
Ozark Trail 10P88 inches
WeatherMaster 10P80.5 inches
Columbia 10P80 inches
Outdoor Products 10P77.5 inches
Coleman Instant 10P73.5 inches

If you were wondering why I could attach the rainfly of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent on my own without any help, it’s because the Coleman has a much lower peak height than the rest.

This is a picture of me stretching my arm out to reach the peak height (73.5 inches) of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me stretching my arm out to reach the peak height (73.5 inches) of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

For my height of 5’3″ (~63 inches or 160 cm), to reach the loop at the very top of the tent (for attaching a lantern or room divider), the highest peak height that I could reach was the WeatherMaster Tent with 80 and a half inches. Even so, I had to really stretch my arm out and stand on tiptoes at the same time.

This is a picture of me reaching the top of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me reaching the top of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

I couldn’t reach the top for the Core and Ozark Trail 10-Person Tents. This can be a bit problematic if you’re trying to install a gear loft, a lantern, or room divider:

This is a picture of me attaching the gear loft and the divider of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent at the same time. (I’m not tall so I’m standing on a Coleman bench.)
This is a picture of me attaching the gear loft and the divider of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent at the same time. (I’m not tall so I’m standing on a Coleman bench.)

Slope of Walls

5 out of 6 these 10-person tents are cabin tents with almost vertical side walls, with 2 exceptions.

This is a picture of the side walls of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, which are almost vertical.
This is a picture of the side walls of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, which are almost vertical.

First, the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent isn’t a cabin tent, and it has this small triangular space here:

The sides of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent aren't completely vertical, and it's more of a triangular space.
The sides of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent aren’t completely vertical, and it’s more of a triangular space.

Here’s what it looks like from the inside:

This is a picture of me sitting in the small triangular space at the widths of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me sitting in the small triangular space at the widths of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

That’s also why I could set up the rainfly of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent on my own without any help.

But excluding the small triangular space, the lowest height in the tent, which is about here at the corners of the tent, is about 58 inches.

This is a picture of me standing at the corners of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent (excluding the small triangular spaces at the widths).
This is a picture of me standing at the corners of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent (excluding the small triangular spaces at the widths).

Second, even though the Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent is supposed to be a cabin tent, I felt like there weren’t enough pole clips in this tent.

This is the tent body of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. I felt that another pole clip at the part where the red arrow is pointing would have increased livable space inside the tent.
This is the tent body of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. I felt that another pole clip at the part where the red arrow is pointing would have increased livable space inside the tent.

As such, the tent body felt a bit droopy, especially on this side of the tent.

This is a picture of me reaching out to the side wall of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, which I felt was droopier than it should have been.
This is a picture of me reaching out to the side wall of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, which I felt was droopier than it should have been.

Also, the side walls aren’t as vertical as I expected them to be.

This is a picture of the side walls of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of the side walls of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

This reduces livable space a little bit for sure. The lowest height in the tent, also at the 4 corners, is about 59 inches.

This is a picture of me standing in the corner of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me standing in the corner of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

The lowest height in the rest of the tents are a few inches higher.

This is a picture of me standing upright in the corner of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me standing upright in the corner of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.

Here’s the lowest height in each 10-person tent, starting from the lowest to highest:

10P TentLowest Height
WeatherMaster 10P58 inches
Coleman Instant 10P59 inches
Outdoor Products 10P61 inches
Columbia 10P62 inches
Ozark Trail 10P65 inches
Core 10P65 inches

Base Area

I took the floor or base area measurements, both length and width (in feet), as well as the base area (in square feet):

10P TentLengthWidthBase Area
WeatherMaster 10P16.67 feet9.08 feet143.6 square feet
Columbia 10P13.92 feet9.92 feet138.0 square feet
Ozark Trail 10P13.75 feet9.92 feet136.4 square feet
Outdoor Products 10P13.58 feet10.0 feet135.8 square feet
Core 10P13.58 feet10.0 feet135.8 square feet
Coleman Instant 10P13.92 feet9.75 feet135.7 square feet

There’s not a lot of difference in the base area of all 6 tents, but here are a few things to take note of.

Apart from the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, the rest of the 10-person tents all have marketed dimensions of 14 by 10 feet, but the measurements that I took were slightly smaller for all the tents.

This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the width of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the width of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

These 5 tents (with base area dimensions of about ~14 by 10 feet) also have a rectangular base area:

Here’s what having 4 queen-sized camping mattresses would look like inside the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.
Here’s what having 4 queen-sized camping mattresses would look like inside the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

Only the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent does not have a rectangular base area:

This is what the base area of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent looks like.
This is what the base area of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent looks like.

So, that’s why the maximum number of queen-sized camping mattresses I could fit into this WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent was only 3.

This is a picture of what 3 queen-sized camping mattresses would look like inside a Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of what 3 queen-sized camping mattresses would look like inside a Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

The mattresses that I used in this picture are slightly smaller, but almost queen size (give or take a few inches). Apart from these 3 mattresses, there’s quite a bit of space leftover for camping gear (the space to where I’m pointing at in the picture).

As for the other 10-person tents with rectangular floor space, they could all fit 4 queen-sized mattresses.

This is a picture of my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent with 4 queen-sized camping mattresses inside the tent.
This is a picture of my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent with 4 queen-sized camping mattresses inside the tent.

However, the problem here is that there’s hardly any space leftover for camping gear, as you can see here.

Here’s what having 4 queen-sized camping mattresses would look like inside the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
Here’s what having 4 queen-sized camping mattresses would look like inside the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

If you’re wondering, every single one of these tents can accommodate 10 single sleeping pads or sleeping bags, but that means you’ve got to sleep practically shoulder to shoulder.

This is a picture of 10 pads in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent (this is a picture taken from the other end of the tent, the opposite end to the picture just above this). Again, there’s a mix of 2 single sleeping pads, 3 double pads, and 1 full-sized mattress. That’s me lying on the full-sized mattress.
This is a picture of 10 pads in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent (this is a picture taken from the other end of the tent, the opposite end to the picture just above this). Again, there’s a mix of 2 single sleeping pads, 3 double pads, and 1 full-sized mattress. That’s me lying on the full-sized mattress.

Plus, you’d have a tiny bit of space for camping gear, especially in the WeatherMaster tent, because it has the biggest base area.

This is a picture of my Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent with 10 sleeping pads (a mix of 2 single, 3 double sleeping pads, and 1 full mattress) inside the tent.
This is a picture of my Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent with 10 sleeping pads (a mix of 2 single, 3 double sleeping pads, and 1 full mattress) inside the tent.

Also, none of these tents have vestibules, so if you leave your shoes out, it will get wet if it rains.

Spaciousness Ratings

So, based on the peak height, lowest height, slope of the walls, and the base area, I rated the spaciousness of each 10-person tent (out of 10, with 10 being the most spacious).

Here are those ratings in chart form:

Chart by Visualizer

And also in table form:

10P TentSpaciousness Rating
Core 10P9.7
Ozark Trail 10P9.7
Columbia 10P9.3
Outdoor Products 10P9.0
WeatherMaster 10P9.0
Coleman Instant 10P7.7

Comfort and Features

For comfort and features, I’m going to focus on the doors, room divider, storage options, and dark room technology.

Doors

Here’s the number of doors that each 10-person tent has, from the most to the least:

10P TentNumber of Doors
Outdoor Products 10P3
WeatherMaster 10P2
Coleman Instant 10P2
Columbia 10P2
Core 10P2
Ozark Trail 10P1

Most of the doors are anywhere between 58 to 65 inches from the floor to the top of the door, so even at my height, I do need to duck a little bit to get through all the doors.

This is a picture of me ducking to get through the T-door of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me ducking to get through the T-door of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent, which is about 60 inches from the floor to the top of the door.

Take note that the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent is only about 47 inches from the ground to the top of the door, so I had to duck even more.

This is a picture of me ducking to get into the tent through the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me ducking to get into the tent through the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

The Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent has 3 doors. One is this huge T-door, which measures about 72 by 51 inches.

This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the length and width of the T-door of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (72 by 51 inches).
This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the length and width of the T-door of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (72 by 51 inches).

To the left and right of the T-door, we have the other 2 smaller side doors, both measuring about 55 by 47 inches.

This is a picture of all 3 doors inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of all 3 doors inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

The WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent has 2 doors, one at each length of the tent. The front door is this super user-friendly hinged D-door, measuring about 47 by 30 inches in dimensions.

This is a picture of me taking off my shoes before going into the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent through the hinged D-door.
This is a picture of me taking off my shoes before going into the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent through the hinged D-door.

The back door on the back length of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, which measures about 57 by 34 inches, is not hinged, so you do have to zip it open and close.

This is a picture of my brother unzipping the back door of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent and clipping it to the side so that it stays open.
This is a picture of my brother unzipping the back door of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent and clipping it to the side so that it stays open.

The Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent also has 2 doors, one at each width of the tent. The door on the left width is this hinged D-door, measuring about 50 by 34 inches in dimensions:

This is a picture of me reaching for the handle of the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me reaching for the handle of the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

The other door on the right width of the tent is not hinged, and measures about 47 by 46 inches.

This is a picture of me ducking to get through the back door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me ducking to get through the back door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

The Columbia 10-Person Tent has one humongous T-door, measuring about 91 by 55 inches:

This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of the T-door of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent (91 by 55 inches).
This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of the T-door of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent (91 by 55 inches).

Right beside it, we have this smaller side door, which is about 47 by 55 inches in dimensions:

This is a picture of me ducking to get through the side door (beside the T-door) of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me ducking to get through the side door (beside the T-door) of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.

The Core 10-Person Tent has 2 identical D-shaped doors, each measuring 53 by 38 inches in dimensions. One is at the front length, and the other is at the back length of the tent.

This is a picture of me tying up the fabric of one of the doors of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me tying up the fabric of one of the doors of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

And lastly, the Ozark Trail 10-Person Tent has only 1 D-shaped door, which measures about 54 by 39 inches in dimensions.

This is a picture of me ducking to get through the door into the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me ducking to get through the door into the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent.

Having just 1 door in a 10-person tent is especially inconvenient, because that means climbing over your tent mates just to get out of the tent.

Room Divider

All of these 10-person tents come with room dividers, but the best one goes to the Columbia 10-Person Tent, which is pre-attached and cannot be removed, though you can pull back the sides of the divider if you don’t want to use it.

This is a picture of me pulling back the sides of the divider in the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me pulling back the sides of the divider in the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Cabin Tent.

What I really like about this pre-attached divider is that it’s completely full length, so there are no gaps at the top, bottom, or sides, and it’s also not very see-through.

My only issue is that both doors are on the same side of the divider.

This is a picture of me zipping up the pre-attached divider of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me zipping up the pre-attached divider of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.

The room divider of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent is similar to the Columbia’s, except for the color.

It does have the same issue though – all 3 doors are on the same side of the divider.

This is what the full-length privacy divider of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like. Notice that each room on each side of the divider can fit 2 queen-sized camping mattresses.
This is what the full-length privacy divider of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like.

As for the rest of the tents, I’m not really a big fan of the room dividers. Let me explain why.

The removable room divider of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent has pretty big gaps at the sides, top, and bottom of the divider.

This is a picture of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent’s room divider, with 1 sleeping pad and 2 double sleeping pads (so 5 pads in total) on one side of the divider.
This is a picture of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent’s room divider, with 1 sleeping pad and 2 double sleeping pads (so 5 pads in total) on one side of the divider.

The removable room divider of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent also has big gaps at the sides, and you actually see quite a bit through it.

This is a picture of the somewhat “full length” room divider of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. You can see the pretty big gaps at the sides.
This is a picture of the somewhat “full length” room divider of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. You can see the pretty big gaps at the sides.

Same with the Core 10-Person tent divider, where you can see almost the entire room through the divider.

This is what the almost full length divider of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent looks like.
This is what the almost full length divider of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent looks like.

And the Ozark Trail 10-Person Tent’s room divider has huge gaps at the sides, top, and bottom, plus there’s no zip down the middle for easy access.

This means that when you want to access the other room, you’ve got to take down the divider and then put it back up again.

This is what the divider of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent looks like. Notice that there’s a huge gap from the top of the divider to the top of the Ozark Trail Tent.
This is what the divider of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent looks like. Notice that there’s a huge gap from the top of the divider to the top of the Ozark Trail Tent.

Storage

Here’s a quick summary of the storage options in each 10-person tent, from the most to least:

10P TentPocketsGear LoftsLoops
Outdoor Products 10P204
WeatherMaster 10P401
Core 10P211
Ozark Trail 10P211
Columbia 10P202
Coleman Instant 10P201

The Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent has only 2 pockets, but they’re the biggest of all these 10-person tents, with each pocket measuring 47 by 7 inches.

This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of each pocket in the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (47 by 7 inches).
This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of each pocket in the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (47 by 7 inches).

Also, the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent has a whopping 4 lantern loops.

This is a picture of my brother hanging up a Black Diamond Moji lantern in one of the room’s lantern loops inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of my brother hanging up a Black Diamond Moji lantern in one of the room’s lantern loops inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

The WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent has 4 pockets, 2 on each width of the tent. Each of the pockets come in this triangular shape, measuring about 20 inches (longest length) by 10 inches (height):

This is a picture of me sticking my hand into one of the pockets of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me sticking my hand into one of the pockets of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

The WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent also has 1 lantern loop:

This is a picture of my Black Diamond Apollo hanging on the lantern loop of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of my Black Diamond Apollo hanging on the lantern loop of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

The Core 10-Person Tent has only 2 pockets, with the bigger one measuring 10 by 19 inches, and the smaller one measuring 14.5 by 7 inches.

This is a picture of me pointing to the bigger pocket (10 by 19 inches) of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me pointing to the bigger pocket (10 by 19 inches) of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

But the Core 10-Person Tent comes with a small gear loft as well. You can use the divider at the same time, and there’s 1 lantern loop too.

This is a picture of me attaching the gear loft and the divider of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent at the same time. (I’m not tall so I’m standing on a Coleman bench.)
This is a picture of me attaching the gear loft and the divider of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent at the same time.
This is a picture of my Black Diamond Apollo lantern hanging on the single lantern loop in the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of my Black Diamond Apollo lantern hanging on the single lantern loop in the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

The Ozark Trail 10-Person Tent also has 2 pockets, each measuring 13 by 6 inches.

This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of one of the storage pockets inside the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of one of the storage pockets inside the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.

Similar to the Core Tent, the Ozark Tent also comes with a gear loft, and 1 lantern loop.

This is a picture of the gear loft in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of the gear loft in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of my Black Diamond Apollo hanging on the lantern loop of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of my Black Diamond Apollo hanging on the lantern loop of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.

The Columbia 10-Person Tent has only 2 pockets (each pocket measuring 15 by 8 inches), and 2 lantern loops (one on each side of the divider).

This is a picture of me using a tape measure to get the dimensions of one of the storage pockets of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me using a tape measure to get the dimensions of one of the storage pockets of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me using my Black Diamond Apollo lantern on one of the lantern loops of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me using my Black Diamond Apollo lantern on one of the lantern loops of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent.

And lastly, the Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent has 2 tiny pockets (7 by 8 inches), and 1 lantern loop.

This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of the storage pockets inside the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of the storage pockets inside the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture where I hung my Black Diamond Apollo lantern on the lantern loop of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture where I hung my Black Diamond Apollo lantern on the lantern loop of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

Blackout Feature

As for the blackout feature, special mention has to go to the Coleman 10-Person Dark Room Instant Cabin Tent, which is the only 10-person tent in this review with this feature.

This is what the Coleman Instant Dark Room tent looks like when all the windows are closed in the middle of the day.

This is a picture of the dark room technology black-out feature of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of the dark room technology black-out feature of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

There’s only a little bit of light seeping in through the gap between the roof and the rainfly, and also from the bathtub flooring at the bottom of the tent. It’s perfect for sleeping in, really.

And if you’re the type that doesn’t like a single spot of light when you’re sleeping at night, check out how dark this tent is at night, it’s seriously quite amazing.

And this is what the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like at night (all windows closed), with a dim light from my Black Diamond Apollo lantern.
And this is what the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like at night (all windows closed), with a dim light from my Black Diamond Apollo lantern.

It’s almost pitch black even though there are still street lights from the outside.

The dark room feature also makes the Coleman tent quite a bit cooler inside the tent during the day, compared to my other tents in this review.

Comfort Ratings

So, based on the doors, room divider, storage options, and blackout features, I rated the comfort levels and features of each 10-person tent (out of 10, with 10 being the most comfortable).

Here are those ratings in chart form:

Chart by Visualizer

And also in table form:

10P TentComfort Ratings
Outdoor Products 10P9.3
Columbia 10P8.3
Coleman Instant 10P8.3
WeatherMaster 10P8.0
Core 10P7.0
Ozark Trail 10P5.3

Ventilation

For ventilation, I looked at the ceiling mesh, vents, windows, and rainy day options.

This is a picture of the ceiling mesh (without the rainfly) of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of the ceiling mesh (without the rainfly) of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

Ceiling Mesh

All of the 10-person tents in this review have a lot of ceiling mesh, so on a hot day, you can take the rainfly off from the outside for more ventilation.

This is a picture of the ceiling or roof mesh of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, with the rainfly removed.
This is a picture of the ceiling or roof mesh of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, with the rainfly removed.

You also can watch the sunset from inside your tent, and stargaze at night if it’s not raining.

This is what the ceiling mesh of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent looks like at night.
This is what the ceiling mesh of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent looks like at night.

Vents

Here’s the number of vents that I found in each 10-person tent. All of these are ground vents:

10P TentVents
Core 10P2
Outdoor Products 10P1
Columbia 10P1
WeatherMaster 10P0
Coleman Instant 10P0
Ozark Trail 10P0

Although the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent has only 1 vent, it’s extra-large and measures about 59 inches in length and 11 inches in width.

This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of the ground vent inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (59 by 11 inches).
This is a picture of me using a tape measure to measure the dimensions of the ground vent inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (59 by 11 inches).

The Core 10-Person Cabin Tent is the only tent with 2 ground vents, both measuring about 32 by 9 inches each.

This is a picture of the ground vent of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent (picture taken from the outside).
This is a picture of the ground vent of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent (picture taken from the outside).

And lastly, the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent has 1 ground vent measuring 40 by 12 inches.

This is a picture of me unzipping the ground vent of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent for some ventilation in the rain.
This is a picture of me unzipping the ground vent of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent for some ventilation in the rain.

The rest of these 10-person tents (Coleman Instant, WeatherMaster, and Ozark) don’t have any vents at all.

Windows

Here’s the number of windows that can be opened from the inside for more ventilation, if it’s not raining. This also includes the mesh paneling from the doors:

10P TentWindow MeshDoor MeshTotal
Coleman Instant 10P527
Columbia 10P437
Outdoor Products 10P347
WeatherMaster 10P426
Core 10P426
Ozark Trail 10P516

So, after opening all the doors and window mesh, I measured the longest length and longest width of each one of them, and calculated the amount of ventilation in square inches.

The Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent has the most ventilation when it’s not raining, with a whopping 5 windows and 2 doors, almost all of them are massive, and it has an incredible ~9,400 square inches of ventilation.

In this picture, you can see the different sized windows of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, and that’s me in the picture opening up all the windows. (From left to right: mesh of hinged door, window beside hinged door, biggest window, and second biggest window).
In this picture, you can see the different sized windows of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, and that’s me in the picture opening up all the windows. (From left to right: mesh of hinged door, window beside hinged door, biggest window, and second biggest window).
In this picture, you can see the different sized windows of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, and that’s me in the picture opening up all the windows. (From left to right: mesh of back door, second biggest window, and biggest window).
In this picture, you can see the different sized windows of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, and that’s me in the picture opening up all the windows. (From left to right: mesh of back door, second biggest window, and biggest window).

Next up, we have the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Cabin Tent, with 4 windows and 3 door mesh panels, for a total ~7,800 square inches of ventilation.

This is a picture of me unzipping the mesh panels of the doors and windows of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. From left to right, we have the T-door, side door, and one of the pull-out windows.
This is a picture of me unzipping the mesh panels of the doors and windows of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. From left to right, we have the T-door, side door, and one of the pull-out windows.
This is a picture of me opening up the windows of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. From left to right, we have the smallest window, tilted window, and the biggest window.
This is a picture of me opening up the windows of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. From left to right, we have the smallest window, tilted window, and the biggest window.

Tied for third place we have both the Outdoor Products 10-Person Cabin Tent and the Core 10-Person Cabin Tent, both with about ~5,900 square inches of ventilation.

The Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent has 3 smaller identical windows on the left side of the tent, plus 4 mesh panels from its 3 doors on the right side of the tent, which are pretty big.

This is a picture of me opening up all the window and door mesh panels in the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. From left to right, we have a window, another identical window, and the mesh panel from the side door.
This is a picture of me opening up all the window and door mesh panels in the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. From left to right, we have a window, another identical window, and the mesh panel from the side door.
This is a picture of me unzipping all the mesh panels inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. From left to right, we have the T-door, side-door, and a regular window.
This is a picture of me unzipping all the mesh panels inside the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. From left to right, we have the T-door, side-door, and a regular window.

The Core Tent has 4 identical windows, plus 2 doors, so 6 mesh panels in total.

This is a picture of me unzipping all the windows of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent. From the left to right, you can see the mesh paneling from one of the doors, and also 2 identical windows.
This is a picture of me unzipping all the windows of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent. From the left to right, you can see the mesh paneling from one of the doors, and also 2 identical windows.

And lastly, in fourth place, we have both the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent and the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, both with about ~5,500 square inches of ventilation.

The WeatherMaster Tent has 4 windows and 2 door mesh panels. 4 of them are not very big, but the 2 angled windows are pretty big.

This is a picture of me opening up 5 windows in the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. You can see the 4 smaller mesh paneling on the 2 lengths of the tent, plus 1 angled window.
This is a picture of me opening up 5 windows in the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. You can see the 4 smaller mesh paneling on the 2 lengths of the tent, plus 1 angled window.

The Ozark Trail Tent has 5 identical windows, and 1 door.

This is a picture of me opening 4 of the windows inside the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent. All the windows are the same size.
This is a picture of me opening 4 of the windows inside the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent. All the windows are the same size.

Rainy Day Options

The problem with these windows is that most of them cannot be opened when it’s raining out. This is because all 6 of these 10-person tents have rainflies that provide only partial coverage, like so:

Even though the rainfly is held away from the tent body of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, part of the window mesh still gets damp from the water. And this is from only light to moderate rain so far, without any wind.
Because of the partial coverage rainfly of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, part of the window mesh gets damp from the water. And this is from only light to moderate rain so far, without any wind.

As such, quite a bit of rain gets onto the mesh of the windows and doors, and will drip right into your tent if you don’t close them.

This picture shows that in heavy rain, the mesh of the windows of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent will be almost completely soaked.
This picture shows that in heavy rain, the mesh of the windows of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent will be almost completely soaked.

So, when it’s raining, the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent actually has the most ventilation.

Not only does it have 1 ground vent, it also has 2 pretty large pull-out windows (1 on each length of the Columbia tent), which I was able to leave open not only in light rain, but in moderate to heavy rain as well.

The Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent has pull-out windows that you can leave open in the rain. You can also see the white-colored ground vent in this picture.
The Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent has pull-out windows that you can leave open in the rain. You can also see the white-colored ground vent in this picture.

Next up, we have the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, with 2 angled windows (1 on each width of the tent) that are slightly larger than the Columbia’s, but with no vents. I was also able to leave these windows open in moderate to heavy rain.

This is a picture of the rain avoiding the angled windows of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of the rain avoiding the angled windows of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

Although the rest of the 10-person tents don’t have these cool angled window features, the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent still has some ventilation from its extra-large vent.

This is a picture of rain falling on the extra-large ground vent of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of rain falling on the extra-large ground vent of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

The Core 10-Person Cabin Tent also has some ventilation with its 2 smaller ground vents (1 on each width of the tent).

This is a picture of me inside the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent measuring the dimensions of the ground vent (32 by 9 inches).
This is a picture of me inside the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent measuring the dimensions of the ground vent (32 by 9 inches).

The only 2 tents with hardly any ventilation is the Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent and the Ozark Trail 10-Person Tent.

They have no angled windows, no vents, and the only ventilation that I got was through the gap between the ceiling mesh and the rainfly.

This is a picture of the roof of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent with the rainfly attached.
This is a picture of the roof of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent with the rainfly attached.

Ventilation Ratings

So, based on the ceiling mesh, vents, total square inches of mesh paneling around each 10-person tent (for hot days), as well as ventilation during rainy days, I rated the ventilation of each 10-person tent (out of 10, with 10 being the most ventilated).

Here are those ratings in chart form:

Chart by Visualizer

And also in table form:

10P TentVentilation Ratings
Columbia 10P9.5
Coleman Instant 10P7.5
WeatherMaster 10P7.5
Outdoor Products 10P7.0
Core 10P7.0
Ozark Trail 10P5.5

Weather Protection

For weather protection, I looked at rain and wind resistance.

Rain Test

Heavy Rain Test

I rain tested each of these 10-person tents, by putting them through at least an hour of rainfall each. It did not rain while I was testing and filming some of the tents, so I made my own rain with this water hose. 

This is a picture of me conducting a rain test on the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent by using a stopwatch and a water hose.
This is a picture of me conducting a rain test on the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent by using a stopwatch and a water hose.

The best tent I have against rain is the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. After an hour of moderate to heavy rain, I noticed no leaks at all, and all the fabric was still bone dry.

This is the result after the 1-hour rain test on the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent – completely dry.
This is the result after the 1-hour rain test on the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent – completely dry.

Take note that the Columbia Mammoth Creek was my only tent to pass the 1-hour rain test with no leaks at all, because it was my only 10-person tent that came with all its seams taped:

This is the seam connecting the tent fabric of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent to the bathtub flooring, which is taped.
This is the seam connecting the tent fabric of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent to the bathtub flooring, which is taped.

But after an entire night of raining, I noticed some leaking through the corners the next morning.

For the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent, I used a water hose to rain test it, and noticed some leaking through the untaped seam (which connects the tent body to the bathtub flooring) after 15 minutes of pretty heavy rainfall.

This is a picture of me spraying water on my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent., with a water hose.
This is a picture of me spraying water on my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent., with a water hose.
I noticed this seam in the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent leaking while I was rain testing it.
I noticed this seam in the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent leaking while I was rain testing it.

After the 1-hour rain test though, apart from the seam leaking, none of the tent body or bathtub flooring of the Outdoor Products Tent was wet.

I also used a water hose with the Core 10-Person Tent, and noticed leaking through one of the doors’ zip and zippers at about 15 minutes in.

This is a picture of one of the doors of my Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent leaking through the zipper and zip. This is about 30 minutes into the rain test.
This is a picture of one of the doors of my Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent leaking through the zipper and zip. This is about 30 minutes into the rain test.

Tip: Moving the zippers to the top of the door, instead of placing them at the bottom of the door (like I did in the picture above) will greatly reduce the leaking.

After about 55 minutes of pretty heavy rainfall, the untaped seam connecting the orange tent body to the flooring also started leaking.

During my rain test of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, the untaped seam connecting the tent body to the flooring started leaking.
During my rain test of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, the untaped seam connecting the tent body to the flooring started leaking.

On top of that, the orange fabric near the ground vent felt a bit damp.

This is a picture of me touching the orange fabric near the ground vent (which felt a bit damp during the rain test).
This is a picture of me touching the orange fabric near the ground vent (which felt a bit damp during the rain test).

For the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, after about 15 minutes of pretty heavy rain, I noticed water started leaking into the tent through this inverted but untaped seam. This seam connects the dark brown fabric of the WeatherMaster tent body to the bathtub flooring.

The inverted seam connecting the dark brown fabric of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent to the bathtub flooring was not seam taped by Coleman, so water started leaking in after about 15 minutes of heavy rain.
The inverted seam connecting the dark brown fabric of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent to the bathtub flooring was not seam taped by Coleman, so water started leaking in after about 15 minutes of heavy rain.

Also, after the 1-hour rain test, the darker brown fabric was slightly damp.

I found that the dark brown fabric of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent was damp after an hour of heavy rain.
I found that the dark brown fabric of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent was damp after an hour of heavy rain.

There was quite a few hours of light rain when I was using the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, and after about 15 to 30 minutes, I noticed that water started seeping in through this inverted but untaped seam, which connects the black tent body to the bathtub flooring.

I noticed that the inverted seam connecting the black fabric of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent to the bathtub flooring was leaking.
I noticed that the inverted seam connecting the black fabric of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent to the bathtub flooring was leaking.

Also, the zip and zippers of the hinged D-door also started leaking.

I also noticed that water started leaking into the tent through the zipper of the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
I also noticed that water started leaking into the tent through the zipper of the hinged D-door of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

I was shocked to find that this yellow rain cover, which was supposed to be protecting the zippers from the rain, was completely soaked with water. I suspect that this made the leaking worse.

I found that this yellow rain cover of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (which was supposed to protect the zipper from rain) was completely soaked with water.
I found that this yellow rain cover of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent (which was supposed to protect the zipper from rain) was completely soaked with water.

Similar to the Core tent tip above, I highly recommend placing the zippers at the top of the door, instead of the bottom, like I did.

And my least water resistant tent was the Ozark Trail 10-Person Tent, because after just 15 minutes of mostly light rain and some moderate rainfall, I started to see some leaking through this seam (connecting the blue tent body to the bathtub flooring), which is not taped.

This is the inverted seam connecting the blue tent fabric of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent to the bathtub flooring, which leaks in the rain, causes puddles to form on the floor.
This is the inverted seam connecting the blue tent fabric of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent to the bathtub flooring, which leaks in the rain, causes puddles to form on the floor.

Also, I noticed that some water was already seeping in through the blue fabric near the bottom of the Ozark Trail tent. After just 15 minutes of light rain!

This is a picture of my hand after I touched the blue fabric at the bottom of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent. My hand is pretty damp.
This is a picture of my hand after I touched the blue fabric at the bottom of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent. My hand is pretty damp.
Light Rain Test

In light rainfall, the Columbia Mammoth Creek, Outdoor Products and Core 10-Person Tents did well, with no leaking seams or wet fabric.

The WeatherMaster and Coleman Instant 10-Person Tents had a tiny bit of leaking through the untaped seam, but the fabric was dry.

Wind Protection

I didn’t specifically test for wind protection, but I did notice a few things when wind was blowing through my 10-person tents.

Light Wind

Because most of these tents are cabin-shaped tents, if you don’t stake them down, they don’t stand a chance even against light wind.

This is a picture of me removing the stakes from the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent, and the light wind in my yard was already blowing it away.
This is a picture of me removing the stakes from the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent, and the light wind in my yard was already blowing it away.

If you stake them down, they’ll do okay in light wind.

This is a picture of my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent in my yard. It is fully staked down and guyed out, so it could withstand light wind.
This is a picture of my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent in my yard. It is fully staked down and guyed out, so it could withstand light wind.
Stronger Wind

For stronger winds, those with more guylines, like the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent with the most number of guylines, which is 10, will do better than those with less guylines.

This is a picture of my Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Cabin Tent withstanding heavy rain and light to moderate rain in my yard. It is fully staked down, and guyed out with all 10 guylines. In the picture, you will be able to see 6 guylines.
This is a picture of my Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Cabin Tent withstanding heavy rain and light to moderate rain in my yard. It is fully staked down, and guyed out with all 10 guylines. In the picture, you will be able to see 6 guylines.

Those with more aerodynamic shapes, like the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, will do slightly better as well.

This is a picture of my WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent in my yard with quite a bit of wind blowing through it.
This is a picture of my WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent in my yard with quite a bit of wind blowing through it.

Even so, bear in mind that the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent has vertical side walls on the front and back length of the tent, so it’s closer to a cabin-shape than a dome-shape.

This is a picture of the back of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. Notice that the wall is almost vertical.
This is a picture of the back of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. Notice that the wall is almost vertical.

Even for my Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent (which is my most water-resistant tent!), after a particularly stormy night, I noticed that one of the fiberglass poles for the roof bent and the tent partially collapsed.

This was the result of the Columbia tent's fiberglass roof pole bending.
This was the result of the Columbia tent’s fiberglass roof pole bending.

Thankfully, the pole wasn’t permanently bent, and I was able to pull it back into shape.

One of the fiberglass poles of my Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent bent out of shape after a particularly stormy night.
One of the fiberglass poles of my Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent bent out of shape after a particularly stormy night.

Basically, bottom line is that if you’re expecting very strong winds, I wouldn’t recommend any of these tents, because all of them have vertical side walls that can pick up a lot of wind, plus high peak heights.

The Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent is a cabin tent with almost vertical side walls, as you can see from this picture here.
The Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent is a cabin tent with almost vertical side walls, as you can see from this picture here.

Rain Test Ratings

So, based on the rain test only, I rated the rain protection of each 10-person tent (out of 10, with 10 being the most water resistant).

Here are those ratings in chart form:

Chart by Visualizer

And also in table form:

10P TentRain Test Ratings
Columbia 10P9.0
Outdoor Products 10P8.0
Core 10P7.0
WeatherMaster 10P7.0
Coleman Instant 10P7.0
Ozark Trail 10P5.0

Quality

For quality, I looked at the flooring, tent body, stitching, zippers, and more. Here are a few important things that I usually take note of.

Denier Rating

Most of the 10-person tents in this review have flooring made of polyethylene and tent bodies made of polyester, so the main differentiating factor was the Denier rating. Generally, the higher the Denier rating, the more durable and higher quality the material.

Check out the high quality materials that the Columbia Mammoth Creek tent is made of:

Here are some details provided by Columbia on the materials of their Mammoth Creek Tent. I found these details on the carry bag.
Here are some details provided by Columbia on the materials of their Mammoth Creek Tent. I found these details on the carry bag.

Also, I prefer that brands fully disclose the Denier ratings of their materials, just like Columbia did.

Stitching

I also check that the stitching all around the tent is consistent, and don’t make excessively large holes in the tent body. Here’s what good stitching looks like:

This is a picture of the seam of the angled window inside the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of the seam of the angled window inside the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

On the other hand, you get poor stitching when the brand can’t even sew in straight lines, there are humongous holes, and you get loose threads all over the tent.

Zipper Quality

For zipper quality, I like to make sure that the zippers have minimal to no snagging and leaking issues. Also, the higher quality zippers (like YKK and SBS) generally feel smoother and are less noisy.

Mesh Quality

There are 2 types of mesh that you will see in this review – no-see-um mesh and regular bug nets. No-see-um mesh keeps out even the smallest of insects, feel soft and silky to the touch, and is higher quality and more expensive.

This is a picture of an ant crawling on the outside of one of my mesh panels of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of an ant crawling on the outside of one of my no-see-um mesh panels of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

Now, let’s go through the quality of each 10-person tent starting from the best.

Columbia 10P Tent

The Columbia 10-Person Tent body is made of 75D polyester, and the flooring is made of 150D polyester, which is much less crunchy and feels higher quality than my other 10-person tents.

This is a picture of the Columbia logo on the white rainfly of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent.
This is a picture of the Columbia logo on the white rainfly of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent.

The stitching all around the tent is good, the zippers are SBS with no snagging issues, and the mesh is no-see-um, smooth and silky.

This is a picture of me holding the SBS zippers of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent.
This is a picture of me holding the SBS zippers of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Tent.

And the Columbia is my only tent that had all its seams taped.

Outdoor Products 10P Tent

The Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent has polyethylene flooring, while the main tent body and rainfly are made of 68D polyester.

This is a picture of me touching the fabric of the rainfly of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me touching the fabric of the rainfly of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

The stitching is good, and the mesh is no-see-um and silky.

This is a picture of me holding the inverted seam in the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me holding the inverted seam in the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent.

However, the zippers do snag on the side doors because of the rain cover (so that’s a minor design flaw).

This is a picture of my side door zipper snagging on the outside rain cover of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of my side door zipper snagging on the outside rain cover of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

WeatherMaster 10P Tent

The WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent has polyethylene flooring, the main tent body is made of 68D polyester, but the rainfly is made of 75D polyester taffeta.

This is a picture of me touching the tent body of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. This is the dark brown fabric of the tent body.
This is a picture of me touching the tent body of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. This is the dark brown fabric of the tent body.

All the seams in the WeatherMaster Tent are inverted, and the stitching is good all around the tent.

This is the inverted seam connecting the lighter brown fabric to the darker brown fabric of the tent body of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is the inverted seam connecting the lighter brown fabric to the darker brown fabric of the tent body of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

The mesh is good quality (though not no-see-um), and the zippers were pretty good quality as well, except for the occasional snag from the outside when using the back door that doesn’t have the hinged feature.

This is a picture of the 2 zippers of the hinged D-door of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of the 2 zippers of the hinged D-door of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

Core 10P Tent

The flooring of the Core 10-Person Tent is made of polyethylene, and the tent body is made of 68D polyester.

This is a picture of the outer tent body of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, which is made of 68D polyester.
This is a picture of the outer tent body of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, which is made of 68D polyester.

The stitching was fine, and the zippers were also okay except for the snagging on the door. It was a bit more snaggy than the WeatherMaster tent.

This is a picture of the rain cover of one of the doors snagging on the zipper of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of the rain cover of one of the doors snagging on the zipper of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent.

Also, my zip on one of the doors leaked during the rain, but the other one was fine.

Coleman Instant 10P Tent

I had no issues with the Coleman Instant Tent’s polyethylene flooring and polyester tent body (although I didn’t know the Denier rating), and the stitching was fine.

This is a picture of me grabbing the rainfly of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me grabbing the rainfly of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

What I did not like though, was first, some of the seam tape wasn’t very well applied around the windows, so it blocks the zipper and makes it more snaggy.

This is a picture of one of the window zippers in the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, which snags into the seam tape.
This is a picture of one of the window zippers in the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent, which snags into the seam tape.

Also, I found a couple of small holes in the mesh. (It might be clearer in the video I uploaded than the picture below.)

This is a picture of me pointing to the 2 small holes I found in the mesh of one of the windows of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me pointing to the 2 small holes I found in the mesh of one of the windows of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

And lastly, my tent came with a defective pole that was attached the wrong way, but I guess manufacturing defects do happen.

Ozark Trail 10P Tent

The flooring of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Tent feels like your regular polyethylene flooring, while the tent and rainfly is made of 68D coated polyester. But when I run my hand over the tent fabric, it feels a bit sticky.

This is a picture of me running my hand over the tent fabric of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, which feels a bit sticky.
This is a picture of me running my hand over the tent fabric of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, which feels a bit sticky.

There were also loose threads all over the tent, and fairly big holes where the guylines are connected to the main tent body.

This is one of the loose threads that I found near one of the the window zippers in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is one of the loose threads that I found near one of the the window zippers in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.

My door zipper kept snagging from the outside every single time I opened the door, at least once, sometimes twice:

This is a picture of my door zipper snagging on the outside rain cover of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of my door zipper snagging on the outside rain cover of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.

There was this sort of inconsistent mesh in 2 places, and I found some rust on the steel wall poles.

This is one of the mesh runs/inconsistent mesh that I found in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.
This is one of the mesh runs/inconsistent mesh that I found in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent.

Also, right out of the box, I noticed some black stuff on my hands after touching the tent.

Quality Ratings

So, based on all the quality metrics I listed above, I rated the quality of each 10-person tent (out of 10, with 10 being the highest quality).

Here are those ratings in chart form:

Chart by Visualizer

And also in table form:

10P TentQuality Ratings
Columbia 10P10.0
Outdoor Products 10P9.2
WeatherMaster 10P9.2
Core 10P8.3
Coleman Instant 10P7.8
Ozark Trail 10P6.3

Portability

For portability, I looked at the weight of each 10-person tent, as well as their packed sizes.

Weight

Here’s the weight of each 10-person tent from the lightest to heaviest:

10P TentWeight
Ozark Trail 10P30.0 pounds
Core 10P30.5 pounds
WeatherMaster 10P30.6 pounds
Coleman Instant 10P31 pounds
Outdoor Products 10P32.8 pounds
Columbia 10P34.4 pounds

Packed Size

And here’s the packed size of each 10-person tent from the smallest to largest:

10P TentPacked Size
Core 10P29 x 16 x 12 inches
Ozark Trail 10P29 x 18 x 13 inches
Columbia 10P30 x 14 x 12 inches
WeatherMaster 10P31 x 18 x 12 inches
Outdoor Products 10P50 x 17 x 12 inches
Coleman Instant 10P50 x 17 x 12 inches

The most important thing to bear in mind here is that 10-person instant tents are about 50 inches long, while regular tents are about 30 inches long, so instant tents are about 40% bigger.

Here’s a picture of all my 10-person tents in my yard:

This is a picture of 5 out of 6 of my 10-person tents. From left to right: 32oz Nalgene bottle, Coleman 2-Person Sundome Tent (for size comparison), Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent, Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of 5 out of 6 of my 10-person tents. From left to right: 32oz Nalgene bottle, Coleman 2-Person Sundome Tent (for size comparison), Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent, Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

Portability Ratings

So, based on the weight and packed size of each 10-person tent, I rated the portability of each 10-person tent (out of 10, with 10 being the most portable).

Actually, I just rated regular 10-person tents as a 5/10, and instant 10-person tents as a 3/10. Just to keep things simple.

Here are those ratings in chart form:

Chart by Visualizer

And also in table form:

10P TentPortability Ratings
Ozark Trail 10P5
Core 10P5
Columbia 10P5
WeatherMaster 10P5
Outdoor Products 10P3
Coleman Instant 10P3

Overall Results

Based on all 7 tests above and the scoring in each test, here’s all the scores of each 10-person tent, side by side for easier comparison:

All the test scores of the six best 10-person tents.

I color-coded the ratings to make it easier to look at. Green is for good, yellow is for not so good, and red is for pretty bad. The overall performance scores are in the last column.

I got to these scores by using this following weightage:

  • Ease of Use: 15%
  • Spaciousness: 10%
  • Comfort and Features: 10%
  • Ventilation: 20%
  • Rain Protection: 20%
  • Quality: 20%
  • Portability: 5%
  • Total: 100%

In case you just want the overall scores without the individual tests, here you go:

Chart by Visualizer

10P TentOverall Rating
Columbia 10P8.5
Outdoor Products 10P8.3
WeatherMaster 10P7.7
Coleman Instant 10P7.6
Core 10P7.4
Ozark Trail 10P6.2

Detailed Specifications

This section contains detailed specs only. Click here if you want to skip past this section and read the buying guide instead.

This is a picture of a few of my 10-person tents in my yard. From left to right: Core 10-Person Tent, Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent, Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of a few of my 10-person tents in my yard. From left to right: Core 10-Person Tent, Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent, Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

Dimensions and Measurements

10P Tent Peak Height Lowest Height Length Width Base Area Weight Packed Size
Columbia 10P 80 inches 62 inches 13 feet 11 inches 9 feet 11 inches 138.0 square feet 34.4 pounds 30 x 14 x 12 inches
Outdoor Products 10P 77.5 inches 61 inches 13 feet 7 inches 10 feet 135.8 square feet 32.8 pounds 50 by 17 by 12 inches
WeatherMaster 10P 80.5 inches 58 inches 16 feet 8 inches 9 feet 1 inch 143.6 square feet 30.6 pounds 31 by 18 by 12 inches
Coleman Instant 10P 73.5 inches 59 inches 13 feet 11 inches 9 feet 9 inches 135.7 square feet ~31 pounds 50 by 17 by 12 inches
Core 10P 90 inches 65 inches 13 feet 7 inches 10 feet 135.8 square feet 30.5 pounds 29 x 16 x 12 inches
Ozark Trail 10P 88 inches 65 inches 13 feet 9 inches 9 feet 11 inches 136.4 square feet 30.0 pounds 29 by 18 by 13 inches

Material and Quality

10P Tent Flooring Bathtub Feature Tent Body Rainfly Poles Zippers Bug Net
Columbia 10P 150D Polyester (2,000mm) Yes (~5 inches) 75D Polyester (800mm) 75D Polyester (800mm) Fiberglass x3, Steel x8 SBS No-see-um
Outdoor Products 10P Polyethylene Yes (5 inches) 68D Polyester (800mm) 68D Polyester (800mm) Steel No brand No-see-um
WeatherMaster 10P Polyethylene Yes (7.5 inches) 68D Polyester 75D Polyester Taffeta (450mm) Fiberglass x4, Steel x9 No brand Regular
Coleman Instant 10P Polyethylene Yes (4 inches) Polyester Polyester Steel No brand Regular
Core 10P Polyethylene No 68D Polyester 68D Polyester Fiberglass x3, Steel x6 No brand Regular
Ozark Trail 10P Polyethylene Yes (~6 inches) 68D Polyester 68D Polyester Fiberglass x3, Steel x6 No brand Regular

Features

10P Tent Windows Doors Vents Pockets Gear Lofts Lantern Loops Room Divider E-Port
Columbia 10P 4 2 1 2 0 2 1 1
Outdoor Products 10P 3 3 1 2 0 4 1 1
WeatherMaster 10P 4 2 0 4 0 1 1 1
Coleman Instant 10P 5 2 0 2 0 1 1 1
Core 10P 4 2 2 2 1 1 1 1
Ozark Trail 10P 5 1 0 2 1 1 1 1

Usage

10P Tent Set Up (2P) Set Up (1P) Take Down (2P) Take Down (1P) Guylines Stakes Single Pads Queen Beds
Columbia 10P 14 minutes 28 minutes 8.5 minutes 16 minutes 10 19 10 4
Outdoor Products 10P 6 minutes 12 minutes 4.25 minutes 8.5 minutes 6 15 10 4
WeatherMaster 10P 10 minutes 19 minutes 8.5 minutes 16 minutes 6 16 10 3
Coleman Instant 10P 7.5 minutes 16 minutes 5 minutes 10 minutes 6 16 10 4
Core 10P 11 minutes 22 minutes 7 minutes 13 minutes 8 20 10 4
Ozark Trail 10P 10 minutes 20 minutes 6.5 minutes 12 minutes 8 14 10 4

How to Choose the Best 10-Person Tent for Yourself

In addition to the 7 tests that I conducted above (ease of use, spaciousness, comfort & features, ventilation, weather protection, quality and portability), here are a few more things that you can consider when choosing the best 10-person tent for yourself and your loved ones:

  1. Type
  2. Capacity
  3. Shape
  4. Budget

Type

There are 2 main types of tents, mainly instant or non-instant (or traditional, whatever you like to call it) tents.

Instant Tents

For this review, I bought the Outdoor Products and Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tents. The set up for both these instant 10-person tents are quite similar, consisting of the following steps:

First, lay the tent body flat on the ground, except for the center hub. Second, pull outward on the 6 pole or elbow joints around the tent body until half of the tent body has been propped up.

This is a picture of my brother pulling outward on one of the extended eaves / elbow joints of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent while we were setting it up.
This is a picture of my brother pulling outward on one of the extended eaves / elbow joints of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent while we were setting it up.
This is the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent partially set up.
This is the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent partially set up.

Third, extend all 6 telescoping wall poles by pulling them apart.

This is a picture of my brother extending the steel wall poles of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of my brother extending the steel wall poles of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

Fourth, drape the rainfly over the tent body and stake out the tent body and guylines.

(Obviously, this is an oversimplification of the 10-person instant tent set up process, but it’s the gist of it.)

Pre-Attached Poles

The reason why instant tents set up so much more quickly than non-instant or traditional tents is because there are no poles to insert through long and potentially snaggy pole sleeves. All the poles are pre-attached, so all you’ve got to do is pull these telescoping pre-attached poles apart.

This is a picture of me pointing to the telescoping pre-attached roof poles of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me pointing to the telescoping pre-attached roof poles of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
Pre-Attached Pole Clips

For both my Outdoor Products and Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tents, I noticed that the pole clips connecting the tent body to the poles were also pre-attached, which also speeds up the set up process.

This is a picture of the top of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. The red arrow is pointing towards one of the pre-attached pole clips, which is connected to one of the pre-attached steel poles.
This is a picture of the top of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. The red arrow is pointing towards one of the pre-attached pole clips, which is connected to one of the pre-attached steel poles.
Pre-Attached Guylines

In addition, even the guylines (usually connected to the rainfly) will come pre-attached to the tent, also with pre-attached tensioners.

This is a picture of me holding one of the pre-attached guylines of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. It comes with a pre-attached black tensioner for easy adjusting.
This is a picture of me holding one of the pre-attached guylines of the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent. It comes with a pre-attached black tensioner for easy adjusting.

Note: In this review of 10-person tents though, every single one of my 10-person tents came with pre-attached guylines and tensioners.

Traditional Tents

For traditional or non-instant tents, you have to go through 2 additional steps as compared to instant tents:

  1. Inserting poles through pole sleeves; and
  2. Clipping the pole clips to the poles.
Poles and Pole Sleeves

So, to start off, you’d have to thread poles through pole sleeves first, before the tent body is able to be propped off the ground. This can take some time, especially if:

  • The pole sleeves are long and snaggy;
  • The poles and pole sleeves are not color-coded for easy identification; and
  • You’ve got lots of poles to insert.

Let me show you what I mean.

The WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent comes with 3 short roof pole sleeves that I found to be pretty much snag-free, and can be easily inserted by just 1 person. Also, notice that the middle pole and pole sleeves are color-coded in red. As such, the WeatherMaster was my least time-consuming tent to set up.

This is a picture of my brother pointing to the red band on one of the steel poles of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. Notice that the pole sleeve in the middle is red in color for easy identification.
This is a picture of my brother pointing to the red band on one of the steel poles of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. Notice that the pole sleeve in the middle is red in color for easy identification.

On the other hand, even though the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent also comes with only 3 roof poles, the poles are not color-coded.

This is a picture of me assembling all the 3 fiberglass roof poles and the 6 steel wall poles of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me assembling all the 3 fiberglass roof poles and the 6 steel wall poles of the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent.

On top of that, the pole sleeves are significantly longer, and I found it time-consuming to run back and forth to thread the poles through, resolve the snag issues, thread the poles through again, and resolve the snag issues again.

This is a picture of the roof of my Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent with all the fiberglass poles inserted into the roof pole sleeves (both green and blue).
This is a picture of the roof of my Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent with all the fiberglass poles inserted into the roof pole sleeves (both green and blue).

And my most time-consuming 10-person tent to set up was the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent, because it has 4 fiberglass roof poles to insert into these pretty long pole sleeves as well, not to mention the 2 additional steel roof poles that I haven’t yet inserted.

This is what the roof of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent will look like when all the fiberglass roof poles have been inserted through the color pole sleeves.
This is what the roof of the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent will look like when all the fiberglass roof poles have been inserted through the color pole sleeves.
Pole Clips

On top of inserting the poles through pole sleeves, I found that my non-instant 10-person tents had a minimum of 6 pole clips (Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent) to a maximum of 10 pole clips (WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent) to attach the tent body to the nearest steel pole. This adds about a full minute to your set up process.

This is a picture of my brother attaching one of the pole clips of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent to the pole. In this picture alone, you can already see 2 pole clips.
This is a picture of my brother attaching one of the pole clips of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent to the pole. In this picture alone, you can already see 2 pole clips.

Pros and Cons

Here are some pros and cons of instant versus traditional 10-person tents.

Set Up

My 10-person instant tents took anywhere between 12 to 16 minutes to set up (1-person timing), while my traditional 10-person tents took anywhere between 19 to 28 minutes. This means that my 10-person instant tents took a whopping 20% to 130% less time to set up.

This is a picture of me setting up the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin tent on my own.
This is a picture of me setting up the Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin tent on my own.

Also, I could set up both my 10-person instant tents on my own, while I could not set up 3 out of 4 of my traditional 10-person tents.

Pack Up

Packing up my 10-person instant tents was also significantly faster, taking anywhere between 4 to 5 minutes to pack up (1-person timing), while my traditional 10-person tents took anywhere between 6.5 to 8.5 minutes.

Packed Size

However, bear in mind that instant 10-person tents tend to have a much larger packed size than their non-instant counterparts.

From my research, my instant 10-person tents were about 50 inches long, while my regular 10-person tents were about 30 inches long, so instant tents are about 40% bigger, which is quite significant, especially if you don’t have a lot of space in your car or at home.

This is a picture of what my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like compared to other non-instant traditional 10-person tents for a packed size comparison. The red arrow is pointing to the Outdoor Products Tent.
This is a picture of what my Outdoor Products 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent looks like compared to other non-instant traditional 10-person tents for a packed size comparison. The red arrow is pointing to the Outdoor Products Tent.
Ease of Cleaning

Also, I don’t think this is a significant point, but I just wanted to take note of it. I found that because my instant 10-person tents had poles that could not be detached, cleaning it was slightly more difficult.

For my regular non-instant 10-person tents, I could just flip the tent over to wash the base. Plus, I could just fold the tent to clean up the base as well.

This is a picture of me washing the base of my Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. Notice how the tent base is flat on the ground.
This is a picture of me washing the base of my Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. Notice how the tent base is flat on the ground.

On the other hand, because I couldn’t remove the poles of my instant 10-person tents, I couldn’t just flip the entire tent over. I had to bunch all the poles up to wash the base.

This is a picture of me washing the base of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.
This is a picture of me washing the base of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Cabin Tent.

Also, whenever I wanted to roll the instant tent over to wash another part of the base, I had to move not only the weight of the tent body, but all the steel poles as well.

Capacity

The base area of all my 10-person tents ranged from 135.7 square feet (Coleman Instant 10-Person Tent) to 143.6 square feet (WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent). So, fitting 10 people into each of these tents means sleeping shoulder to shoulder with your buddy next to you.

And yes, I actually tested this out by fitting 10 single sleeping pads or sleeping bags into each tent. Check out this picture:

This is a picture of 10 pads in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent. There’s a mix of 2 single sleeping pads, 3 double pads, and 1 full-sized mattress. That’s me lying on 1 of the double sleeping pads.
This is a picture of 10 pads in the Ozark Trail 10-Person Family Cabin Tent. There’s a mix of 2 single sleeping pads, 3 double pads, and 1 full-sized mattress. That’s me lying on 1 of the double sleeping pads.

So, if you have 10 people that you want to squeeze into a tent, along with a bunch of camping gear, I wouldn’t recommend any of these 10-person tents. You might want to splurge on a 12 or maybe even 14-person tent instead (though I know those are pretty uncommon).

You could squeeze 8 people into these 10-person tents, by filling the tent up with 4 queen-sized camping mattresses, though bear in mind that there won’t be any leftover space for camping gear.

This is a picture of me lying down on a mattress inside the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. All of the 4 mattresses inside this tent are queen-sized.
This is a picture of me lying down on a mattress inside the Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent. All of the 4 mattresses inside this tent are queen-sized.

My recommendation would be to fit a maximum of 6 people into these 10-person tents, and you’d be comfortable with quite a bit of space for your gear. Or, you could fit just 4 people, and have an entire living room with tables and chairs.

This is a picture of the divider with both sides pulled back and clipped in place. I split the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent into 2 rooms – 1 has two queen-sized camping mattresses, and the other has a Coleman bench.
This is a picture of me splitting the Outdoor Products 10-Person Tent into 2 rooms – 1 has two queen-sized camping mattresses, and the other has a Coleman bench.

Shape

There are 2 main shapes of camping tents – dome and cabin. (Of course, there are others, but we won’t be going through them now.)

Cabin

The larger the capacity of the camping tent that you’re looking for, the more likely they will be to be cabin-shaped.

In fact, 5 out of 6 of my 10-person tents were cabin-shaped, except for the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

This is a picture of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent in my yard, which is cabin-shaped.
This is a picture of the Coleman 10-Person Instant Tent in my yard, which is cabin-shaped.

Cabin-shaped tents typically have almost vertical side walls, giving you much more livable space inside the tent. Unlike dome-shaped tents that slope downwards, cabin-shaped tents don’t slope downwards too much. In fact, you might still be able to stand up everywhere inside the tent, even at the 4 corners (where the lowest height is), like I was able to.

This is a picture of me standing at the corners of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, which is about 65 inches high.
This is a picture of me standing in the corner of the Core 10-Person Straight Wall Cabin Tent, which is about 65 inches high.

The main problem with cabin tents though, is that the vertical side walls can pick up a lot of wind, especially if they’re not staked down.

This is a picture showing that the side walls of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Cabin Tent are almost vertical.
This is a picture showing that the side walls of the Columbia Mammoth Creek Cabin Tent are almost vertical.

Dome

Dome-shaped tents are what its name suggests – they look like domes. They may or may not have a high peak height in the center of the tent, but slope downwards, so you won’t get that nice high peak height throughout the tent. The benefit of these tents is that there aren’t any vertical side walls that can catch a lot of wind, and they’re much more sturdy in heavier winds.

I was hard-pressed to find a dome-shaped 10-person tent, but here’s one – the Mountain Hardwear Stronghold Dome Tent.

I only wish that I had enough money to buy this tent and test it out, but it cost more than all my other 10-person tents combined, so I had to pass. Also, I haven’t been base camping (yet), so maybe next time.

Hybrid

My WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent was neither a cabin nor a dome shape, so I just decided to call it a hybrid.

The WeatherMaster Tent has vertical side walls on the front length and the back length of the tent, with a nice high peak height of slightly more than 80 inches. I was able to stand up almost everywhere inside the tent, which is typical of a cabin-shaped tent.

This is a picture of me opening up the angled window in the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.
This is a picture of me opening up the angled window in the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent.

However, the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent also has these significantly sloping walls at the 2 widths of the tent, to cater for the 2 angled windows.

The sides of the widths of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent are not vertical, and there’s a small triangular space.
The sides of the widths of the Coleman WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent are not vertical, and there’s a small triangular space.

I felt that the WeatherMaster was able to take light winds better than the rest of my tents, because it’s not exactly a cabin shaped. But even so, the vertical side walls still pick up a lot of wind.

This is a picture of the back of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. Notice that the wall is almost vertical.
This is a picture of the back of the WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent. Notice that the wall is almost vertical.

Recommendation

Essentially, because all my 10-person tents had vertical side walls, I wouldn’t recommend any of them if you’re expecting tons of wind.

If you need something more dome-shaped to endure strong winds, you could either splash out on the Mountain Hardwear Stronghold Dome Tent, or buy multiple smaller dome-shaped tents.

But if you’re not expecting only minimal to light wind, all of these 10-person tents should do fine, as long as you stake them down.

Budget

Naturally, if you’re looking for a tent with a large capacity, it’s expected that you’re going to have to shell out more, as compared to if you were looking for a tent with a smaller capacity.

I spent a whopping $1,500 (slightly more than that, actually) on all of my six 10-person tents, and each of them ranged from about $100 to $400.

If you need something on a budget, I paid only slightly more than $100 on my Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent, so that’s worth checking out.

This is what the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent first looked like after I took it out of the original cardboard packaging (pictured at the beginning of this blog post).
This is what the Ozark Trail 10-Person Cabin Tent first looked like after I took it out of the original cardboard packaging (pictured at the beginning of this blog post).

If you have a little bit more to spend, I paid about $250-$300 for my WeatherMaster 10-Person Tent, which was a pretty good deal.

And if you want only the premium stuff, I spent more than $400 on my Columbia Mammoth Creek 10-Person Tent, so you can check that out.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Why You Should Trust Us

Well, unlike most 10-person tent product reviews you find on the internet, I actually own, used and thoroughly tested all of these 10-person tents. Yup, every single one.

I spent over $1,500 buying these six 10-person tents, which took me a few months of saving to do. After that, I spent at least a week in each one (so 6 weeks in total) for thorough testing, filming and data collection. And that’s not all. Finally, I spent 2-3 months after that putting together my series of YouTube videos and these blog posts on all these 10-person tents, trying to be as comprehensive as possible. Altogether, I logged hundreds of hours on these 10-person tents.

Also, I don’t accept free products from manufacturers, and don’t accept sponsored posts or YouTube videos that may cause me to give a biased review. Each and every product is bought by me with my savings, and all opinions are my own, from months of real-world testing and usage.

Conclusion

Ultimately, of all the 10-person tents that I bought and tested, I think there’s one that will best suit your needs, and here’s quick summary of all of them:

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